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A New Space for Photo-Eye


Photo-eye Gallery in Santa Fe is celebrating its 35th year with a move from Garcia Street to the Railyard Arts District in Santa Fe. As part of the transition, the bookstore will move into the current gallery space, now dubbed the Bookstore + Project Space.

 

— By Jean Dykstra  04/17/2014

Maroesjka Lavigne: Island

Robert Mann Gallery, New York


Maroesjka Lavigne, Viewpoint, Gullfoss, Reykjavik, 2011. ©Maroesjka Lavigne, courtesy Robert Mann Gallery

In a photograph that recalls Caspar David Friedrich's Wanderer Above the Sea of Fog, a lone figure overlooks Iceland's Gullfoss waterfall. Unlike Friedrich's wanderer, who towers confidently over the scene beneath him, Belgian photographer Maroesjka Lavigne's subject is nearly indiscernible in the landscape, his black clothing almost completely blanketed in snow. 

He’s not the only person or man-made object made small by nature in Lavigne's series Island, on view at Robert Mann Gallery through May 17. A swimmer floating in a turquoise pool is rendered faceless by Lavigne's flash against the surface of the water. A red bus and a red roof are almost entirely veiled in white. Nature, if not humanity's superior, often seems at least its contemporary, a force with which to be reckoned.

But Lavigne's perspective is not so simplistic. Just as often, we are forced to consider humanity's influence on nature. In one photograph, a smattering of pink shrimp lie fetus-like across a clinically white kitchen sink. In another, taken at Reykjavik's Blue Lagoon, the tops of bodies are dots across the landscape, drifting in a cloud of steam rising from the water. Or is that haze from the industrial facility, just visible in the background, spewing clouds of smoke from a set of chimneys? 

Maroesjka Lavigne, Shrimps, Reykjavik, 2011. ©Maroesjka Lavigne, courtesy Robert Mann Gallery

What is natural anyway? Amidst a flat environment of brown stone and leafless trees, Lavigne photographs a white arctic fox at suspiciously stiff attention, looking almost too perfect to be real (evoking her series Animal Cabinet, which includes images of actual taxidermied animals). In another photograph, a circle of partly melted snowmen stand in a Stonhenge-esque formation, raising questions about its origin and relation to the natural world. 

Lavigne’s Iceland is frequently strange and phantasmagorical – more David Lynch than National Geographic. In perhaps her most cinematic portrait, a young woman gazes pensively out a car’s dark window, a small band of light framing her eyes like a masquerade mask. 

Lavigne’s brilliance lies in this interplay between the familiar and the extraordinary. At first glance, the hallmarks of Icelandic photography are immediately present and ubiquitous in her work: the vast, wintry landscapes, the soaring mountains, the quaint, isolated homes. But she is always looking beyond the expected. Her images, consequently, bring novelty and intelligence to a subject too often photographed beautifully but uninventively. Lavigne was only 21 years old when she photographed Island, but her complex vision transcends her age.

 

— By Jordan G. Teicher  04/16/2014

George Dureau, 1931-2014


George Dureau, Arthur Desilva, 1989. Courtesy Arthur Roger Gallery

New Orleans photographer George Dureau passed away on April 7 at the age of 83.  In sculptures, drawings and photographs, Dureau focused on the human figure, but he was perhaps best known for his black-and-white nude portraits of men, some explicitly homoerotic, and some picturing men with missing limbs. "I think he had a way of depicting his subjects (including amputees and dwarves) that was very frank but very evocative at the same time," Miranda Lash, curator of contemporary art at the New Orleans Museum of Art, told the Times-Picayune. "He did it in a way that seemed powerful and heroic."

Born in New Orleans, Dureau attended Louisiana State University, earned a fine arts degree, and spent decorated department store windows for a time. After serving in the Army, he studied architecture at Tulane and became a fine artist. 

Dureau, who influenced the work of Robert Mapplethorpe, among others, may have been better known had he moved to New York, but he remained a lifelong resident of New Orleans. 

 

 

— By Jean Dykstra  04/15/2014

More AIPAD Picks from Elisabeth Biondi

Robert Mann Gallery, New York


Harry Bowers, Jane #1, 1978/2014. Courtesy Julie Saul Gallery

The colors of Harry Bowers's photo are bright and cheerful and there is an odd flatness to the photograph that reminded my of Japanese prints. Vaguely erotic, certainly a contemporary photograph, I thought. It turns out it was made in 1978, subsequently lost and then re-discovered in 2004. Harry Bowers, a pioneer in scanning, technology, devised a way to photograph the garments that makes them so vibrant and flat. 

Jen Davis, Untitled No. 39, 2010. Courtesy Lee Marks Gallery

Like a vermeer painting, the composition is perfect, the light exquisitely beautiful. Jen Davis's self-portrait -- she photographed herself for 11 years -- went straight to my heart. I could not take my eyes off her defiant face and wondered what thoughts led to this complex expression.  

— By Elisabeth Biondi  04/14/2014

Elisabeth Biondi's AIPAD Picks

Robert Mann Gallery, New York


Allen Frame, Mariachis, Mexico City, 2000. Courtesy Gitterman Gallery

I think of AIPAD as the Tiffany of Photography Fairs. It is tilted towards classical photography and vintage prints but each year more contemporary photography can be seen. It is a great stroll through the history of photography from its beginning until today. What follows is my subjective, idiosyncratic, insticntive choices. 

I love the mystery of the photograph-late at night, outside, somewhere in mexico. It makes me dream up a short story filled with nocturnal pleasures.

Masao Yamamoto, #1529 Kawa=flow, 2007. Courtesy Fifty One Fine Art Photography

Masao Yamamaoto's photography is a little jewel. It is an image reduced to its essentials, very japanese, very zen. I become calm and peaceful admiring it.  

Michiko Kon, Rabbit and Eyes, 2013. Courtesy Photo Gallery International

This was the most surreal photograph I saw. I looked at it wondering how the artist created this strange alien easter bunny. The answer is that Michiko Kon, a photographer well known in Japan, constructs a sculpture with natural ingredients-- flowers, food, etc.-- and photographs it the same day and before it perishes.  

— By Elisabeth Biondi  04/14/2014

Sarah Schmerler's Picks from AIPAD

Robert Mann Gallery, New York


James Welling, 4580, 2007. Courtesy David Zwirner Gallery

Photography has been chasing painting since its invention, or so the story goes. But not so at AIPAD this year. Art fairs give viewers a lot to look at in a limited space; they give us a snapshot that is as much about economic bottom lines as about artistic horizons. The closer those two extremes get, the healthier the medium. Images like the following, to me, close the gap.

Light is photo's material muse, and it was a show stopper in two photos by James Welling at David Zwirner's booth. Welling went to Philip Johnson's famed Glass House in New Canaan, Connecticut, and shot prismatically gorgeous, blown-out images like the ones you see here, on site, using gels but no manipulation post capture. What results is a triple threat: someone else's art from the past (Johnson's), inside a work of contemporary art (Welling's), that's about the medium itself (photography).

Inka Lindergard and Niclas Holmstrom, Becoming Wilderness IXA. Courtesy Grundemark Nilsson Gallery

Roman Signer-esque ephemeral gestures were captured on film by Finland-born Inka Lindergård and Swedish-born Niclas Holmström, who released a highly reflective powder into the air by the beach at night and made it look like mist caught in the camera's flash. On view at Grundmark Nilsson Gallery, both are under 30, and the fun they seem to be having fixing light onto paper is palpable.

Beatrice Helg, Crepuscule XVI, 2006. Courtesy Joel Soroka Gallery

 

Swiss-born artist Beatrice Helg (who showed at Joel Soroka Gallery) makes somewhat more ponderous images but with a nicely evasive shimmer in a series that, appropriately enough, is entitled "Crepuscule" (Twilight). The metal plates nest within one another as if on a proscenium stage set, and the corrosions are the result of the artist playing with acids and such before making the shots. Scale? Context? Who cares. Helg's facility with conveying visual weight (think: abstract oil painting) render questions like these moot.

Likewise, Lauren Semivan, brought by Bonni Benrubi Gallery, blurs the lines between fine art and photographic art -- quite literally. She makes ephemeral drawings in charcoal on the wall, photographs them, erases them by wiping down the wall, and starts again. The photos last; the drawings don't. We'll be hearing more from  this young, Detroit-based artist.

And finally, in deference to the art of the photogram, that early, boundary-crossing process, we get an embarrassment of riches at Alan Klotz's booth in the form of Theodore Roszak's geometric compositions from the late 1930s. Museum curators buy them because they know that artists (like Roszak, who is better known for his sculptures) often prefer to work in more than one medium, and that all are equally valid -- and valued. Those who have an eagle eye for tracking an artist's vision, no matter the material in which it's expressed, beat the market at its own game.

 

— By Sarah Schmerler  04/14/2014

2014 Guggenheim Fellowships


Congrats to Robert Dawson, LaToya Frazier, Jason Fulford, Phyllis Galembo, Gregory Halpern, Brenda Kenneally, Andrew Moore, Lori Nix, Matthew Pillsbury, Mark Ruwedel, Rachel Sussman on receiving a 2014 Guggenheim fellowship http://bit.ly/1lNaXPM

— By Bill Mindlin  04/10/2014

Lisa Sette Relocating


The Lisa Sette Gallery is moving from its longtime home in Scottsdale, Arizona, to midtown Phoenix. The gallery will relocate to an Al Beadle-designed modernist building in downtown Phoenix this summer and its inaugural show there is scheduled for June. A 30-year celebration is slate for the following year. Sette’s roster includes work by conceptual photographers Fiona Pardington and Luis Molina-Pantin and shows by Masao Yamamoto and Mark Klett, among other artists.

— By Jean Dykstra  04/07/2014

Photo Eye: Avant-Garde Photography in Europe

Museum of Fine Arts, Boston


Josef Sudek, Labyrinths. Courtesy Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

The years between the two World Wars produced major experimental transformations in politics and in art. Surrealists sought to alter consciousness by viewing common sights askance and bringing the unconscious up for inspection.  Photographers proposed to change the nature of vision: László Moholy-Nagy coined the term “the new vision” for his belief that photography could revolutionize perception by seeing the world in a way that eyes could not.

Photo Eye: Avant-Garde Photography in Europe at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, through July 6 is a relatively small show – 45 images, mostly from the museum’s holdings – that touches on a large topic.  The show strays beyond the dates occasionally and includes a few images that don’t seem to fit, but there are many pleasures and some revelations, including several by little-known photographers – a clever photomontage by the German Friedrich Vordemberge-Gildewart; two Czech amateurs, Jan Lauschmann and Eugen Wiskovsky; and Ivan Shagin’s stunning image, part photojournalism, part propaganda, of a scientific experiment to send an enormous balloon into the stratosphere, powered by advanced Soviet science. 

Man Ray, Untitled (The Primacy of Matter over Thought). Courtesy Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

Experimental approaches were immensely varied and included the photogram, bird’s-eye angles, photo-montage, and a bit of Surrealism, including Herbert List’s deadpan image of half an ancient stone leg and a lonesome stone foot in a museum garden. Light, shadow, and reflection often outweighed the nominal subject, and common objects were made strange or combined with abstract forms. Extreme close-ups, color, and solarization were other techniques -- Man Ray’s lovely The Primacy of Matter over Thought straightforwardly depicts a woman’s face, but a gray cloud, perhaps her mind, springs from her forehead.

A few photographers acknowledged current events, glorifying industry, machines, and technology, and both Brassaï and Kertész photographed homeless men beside posters touting the good life.

The dominance of experiment sets European modernism apart from American photography of the period.  Americans like Edward Weston, and Ansel Adams at times, were modernists, but the preeminent American mode during the Depression was documentary – from the FSA and WPA to the Photo League.  Experiment here was marginal, as had long been true of American arts and its conservative audience.  When European artists and photographers immigrated in force, packing contagious experimentation in their bags, American art was primed to catch the fever.  

 

— By Vicki Goldberg  04/07/2014

Lower East Side Photo Walk


The number of galleries on the Lower East Side continues to grow, and the dealers have organized a Lower East Side Photo Walk on Sunday, April 13, to coincide with the AIPAD Photography Show. So leave some time to venture downtown, because more than 25 galleries with photography shows are participating in the walk, from Anastasia Photo and BOSI Contemporary to Sasha Wolf Gallery and LMAK. Galleries are open from 12 to 6 pm. 

— By Jean Dykstra  04/04/2014

Roe Ethridge: Sacrifice Your Body

Andrew Kreps Gallery, New York


Roe Ethridge, Double Ramen, 2013. Courtesy the artist and Andrew Kreps Gallery

Other things this exhibition at Andrew Kreps asked viewers to sacrifice were: residual notions of originality in photography, good taste, a sense of history, belief in the cognitive value of art, and the comforting irony of camp.

Have we cleared the decks? That seems to be Roe Ethridge’s ongoing intention -- to demonstrate the exhaustion of virtually every genre of photography, from the commercial still to the art photograph.  How else to explain, for example, two versions of the same image of a flounder, one simply a crop of the other, or a diptych of ramen noodles that involves the side-by-side juxtaposition of the same banal image?  One good thing about Ethridge is that he seems not have subscribed to any platitudes about the “transformation” of photography and its turn to abstraction, process, or sculpture.  He keeps his eye squarely on the ball: how do we make pictures now, of what, and why?  

Confronted by photographs that happily engage their roots in advertising, fashion, product still life, and vernacular imagery without ever promising to breathe new life into these convention-bound containers, viewers are by now apt to see in this work a terrible atavism. Even mortality – especially mortality – is a contentless cliché. 

Roe Ethridge, Football and Lavender, 2013. Courtesy the artist and Andrew Kreps Gallery

The skeleton in the title image is a jumble of plastic bones and a skull adorned with a Florida Seminoles baseball cap; “sacrifice your body” sounds like a football injunction. But Ethridge’s enormous influence on younger photographers reveals a struggle beneath the surface of contemporary photography to recover a distinctive value for its pursuit.  There’s no going back to the prelapsarian days of the New Color, of the unphotographed and unconsecrated universe of places and things, and we can see photographers from Elad Lassry to Thomas Demand facing up to art photography’s irrelevancy in the face of a tsunami of image exchange. They’ve made probing pictures, but neither one has confronted the sheer familiarity of contemporary imagery as directly as Ethridge has. He has bent each stereotype he engages, and in doing so has shown younger photographers how to open up a space of discovery and pleasure, how not to be crippled by a sense that all the pictures have already been taken.  Freedom involves deliberate forgetting of the past, recognizing that photographs are beautiful, and believing that the world is the best thing that ever happened to a camera, and vice versa.      

 

— By Lyle Rexer  04/02/2014

Laurie Simmons: Kigurumi, Dollers and How We See

Salon 94 Bowery, New York


Laurie Simmons, Redhead/ Red Dress / Selfie, 2014. Courtesy Salon 94

Since her seminal disquieting photographic tableaus from the Seventies, Laurie Simmons has employed dolls as psychological surrogates for emotionally fraught social interrogations of the human condition.  In a delightful twist, Simmons shifts, in her latest work, on view at Salon 94 through April 28, to the subject of people who dress as dolls to enter into elaborate role-playing fantasies. Consistent throughout is a wonderful sense of play, of artifice and humanness converging into an almost formalist frisson, and a potent double dose of visual seduction and disturbing subtext. But while people have played with dolls for centuries, Simmons’s appropriation of these relatively recent subcultural behaviors raises perplexing questions about the nature of identity in this highly mediated reality.

Titled Kigurumi, Dollers and How We See, Simmons’s portraits of people/personae take their cue directly from the massive field of Cosplay, a contraction of “costume” and “play” that has emerged from Japanese youth culture. Born of the characters and storylines created in manga comics, anime, and video games, Cosplay has spread like a viral meme among youth around the globe. This is a hybrid that seemingly begs hybridity, easily absorbing the latent energies of escapism we might find anywhere, from Renaissance Fairs and Civil War reenactments to Trekies or the audience participation in midnight Rocky Horror Picture Show screenings of yore. Imagine the utter suspension of disbelief that children exercise magnified beyond imagination into a massive DIY industry of costume production, conventions, lifestyle identifications, and a highly mobilized social interconnectivity, and you get a small picture of the immense pathology that Simmons has tapped into.

Laurie Simmons, Blonde/ Pink Dress/ Standing Corner, 2014. Courtesy Salon 94

Less about social anthropology than adapting this language to her own artistic vision, Simmons’s large-scale photographs of Kigurumi (a performance-based subgenre of Cosplay) irons out the disjunctive aspects of the medium into a far more aesthetic plane. While Cosplay is often unintentionally hilarious as short fat kids transform themselves into impossible anatomical ideals as only animation can create, Simmons is all about invoking as believable a fiction as possible. Hiring her own models/actors keen on this game of pretend, commissioning masks from a Cosplayer in Russia, and adorning her characters not simply in the usual “zentai” skin-tight full bodysuits but also with latex fetishwear, Simmons conjures archetypes of skewered meaning, at once cloyingly super-cute and deeply eroticized, figures of poetic innocence and profound perversity. In a bow to the mass projection and malleability of identity today, one suite of Simmons’s photographs are in fact selfies taken by the characters themselves, a perfectly post-modern bit of authorship from this formidable voice of the Pictures Generation. 

 

— By Carlo McCormick  03/29/2014

Getty Museum Acquires Tress Photographs


Arthur Tress, Child Buried in Sand, Coney Island, 1968. ©Arthur Tess, courtesy the  J. Paul Getty Museum

The J. Paul Getty Museum has acquired 66 gelatin silver prints by photographer Arthur Tress. The bulk of the acquisition consists of staged images of children from his series The Dream Collector (1972) and Theater of the Mind (1976). They are the first photographs by Tress to enter the Getty’s collection.

Tress began his career as a street photographer but eventually became more interested in staged, more theatrical images. 

— By Jean Dykstra  03/28/2014

Amy Elkins Wins Aperture Portfolio Prize


Amy Elkins, Eliot Johnson, Executed June 24, 1987; age 38.

Amy Elkins is the winner of the 2014 Aperture Portfolio Prize. Elkins submitted two portfolios, both dealing with capital punishment and her exchange of letters with inmates on death row. 

Parting Words consists of black-and-white portraits of inmates who were executed, constructed using the subjects’ own final words.

Black is the Day, Black is the Night intersperses letters exchanged with inmates with images that attempt to capture the interior landscape evoked in the letters, from imagined seascapes to items described by inmates. She has also created color portraits of inmates in which their faces are pixilated and obscured based on the length of time they’ve been incarcerated. 

“A system that uses long-term solitary confinement and capital punishment is broken,” Elkins has observed. The work, thoughtful and elegiac, asks viewers to contemplate the dehumanizing aspects of capital punishment.

— By Jean Dykstra  03/28/2014

Moutoussamy-Ashe Photos Go to Smithsonian


Jeanne Moutoussamy-Ashe, Jake and His Boat Arriving on Daufuskie's Shore, part of the collection of photographs donated to the Smithsonian

Bank of America Corp. has donated a collection of 61 photographs by Jeanne Moutoussamy-Ashe to the Smithsonian’s National Museum of African-American History and Culture. The photographs focus on Daufuskie Island, off the coast of North Carolina, which was inhabited primarily by the Gullah people, freed slaves and their descendants, from the end of the Civil War until the 1970s. 

Moutoussamy-Ashe took the photographs between 1977 and 1981, when there were fewer than 84 permanent residents on the island, who supported themselves by catching oysters and growing cotton. 

The Bank of America also made a donation of $1 million to the capital campaign of the museum, which will open in 2015. The photographs will be permanently installed at the museum.

 

— By Jean Dykstra  03/27/2014

archives

2014
December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
A New Space for Photo-Eye


Maroesjka Lavigne: Island

at Robert Mann Gallery, New York


George Dureau, 1931-2014


More AIPAD Picks from Elisabeth Biondi


Elisabeth Biondi's AIPAD Picks


Sarah Schmerler's Picks from AIPAD


2014 Guggenheim Fellowships


Lisa Sette Relocating


Photo Eye: Avant-Garde Photography in Europe

at Museum of Fine Arts, Boston


Lower East Side Photo Walk


Roe Ethridge: Sacrifice Your Body

at Andrew Kreps Gallery, New York


March
Laurie Simmons: Kigurumi, Dollers and How We See

at Salon 94 Bowery, New York


Getty Museum Acquires Tress Photographs


Amy Elkins Wins Aperture Portfolio Prize


Moutoussamy-Ashe Photos Go to Smithsonian


Walead Beshty: Selected Bodies of Work

at Regen Projects, Los Angeles


Public Intimacy: Art and Other Ordinary Acts in South Africa

at Yerba Buena Center for the Arts, San Francisco


Prince/Cariou Case Settled


Daniel Gordon Wins Paul Huf Award


New Photo Gallery in Williamsburg


ICP on the Move


National Gallery of Art Receives Gift of Photographs


Jamie Warren Wins Baum Award


Chloe Dewe Mathews Wins Gardner Fellowship


Matthew Pillsbury: Nate and Me

at Sasha Wolf Gallery, New York


Getty Images Opens Up Library


Paula McCartney: A Field Guide to Snow and Ice

at Klompching Gallery, Brooklyn


American Cool

at National Portrait Gallery, Washington, D.C.


February
Steichen/Warhol: Picturing Fame

at Block Museum of Art, Evanston


ICP Announces Infinity Award Winners


Onward in Philly


Samuel Fosso Photographs Rescued


J. Shimon & J. Lindemann: We Go From Where We Know

at John Michael Kohler Art Center, Sheboygan


John Stanmeyer Wins World Press Photo Award


Not Your Grandmother's Librarian


Patrick Nagatani: Outer and Inner: Contemplations on the Physical and the Spiritual

at Andrew Smith Gallery (annex), Santa Fe


New Photo Gallery in Boston


Fred McDarrah: Save the Village

at Steven Kasher Gallery, New York


J.D. 'Okhai Ojeikere, 1930-2014


Kevin Cooley and Phillip Andrew Lewis: Unexplored Territory

at Kopeikin Gallery, Los Angeles


January
Public Art Project Highlights the Boroughs


Carrie Mae Weems: Three Decades of Photography and Video

at Guggenheim Museum, New York


Getty Acquires Pictorialist Photographs


Peter Hujar: Love & Lust

at Fraenkel Gallery, San Francisco


Child Identified in 1908 Lewis Hine Photo


Heather Snider Joins SF Camerawork


The Sochi Project: An Atlas of War and Tourism in the Caucasus

at DePaul Art Museum, Chicago


Phillip Prodger Joins London's National Portrait Gallery


Tanya Marcuse: Fallen

at Julie Saul Gallery, New York


Joshua Chuang Joins CCP


Sophie Calle: Last Seen

at Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum, Boston


Danielle Durchslag: Relative Unknowns

at Denny Gallery, New York


Carnegie Museum Founds Hillman Photography Initiative


Soo Kim Awarded Gutmann Fellowship


Symposium on March on Washington


2013
December
November
Balthus: The Last Studies

at Gagosian Gallery (Mad Ave), New York


Saul Leiter, 1923-2013


Maine Philanthropists Give Collection to Portland Museum of Art


Daniel Morel Wins Suit Against Getty Images/AFP


Sean McFarland: Glass Mountains

at Stephen Wirtz Gallery, San Francisco


John Divola: As Far As I Could get

at Santa Barbara Museum of Art, LACMA, Pomona Museum of Art,


Eileen Quinlan: Curtains

at Miguel Abreu Gallery, New York


ICP Names New Executive Director


Clarence John Laughlin Award Announced


Prix Pictet Shortlist Announced


And the Winner Is ....


Libération's Powerful Homage to Photography


Tanja Hollander: The Landscapes of Are You Really My Friend?

at Carroll And Sons, Boston


War/Photography: Images of Armed Conflict and its Aftermath

at Brooklyn Museum of Art, Brooklyn


Lisa Hostetler to Eastman House


Dispatched to Texas


Finding Vivian Maier


Queens Museum Reopens with Photos by Jeff Chien-Hsing Liao


New E-Book from Library of Congress


Hello, Goodbye


October
Iké Udé: Style and Sympathies

at Leila Heller Gallery, New York


Deborah Turbeville, 1932-2013


ICP Celebrates Robert Capa's Centenary


Of Walking

at Museum of Contemporary Photography, Chicago


Here is New York


Polly Borland: You

at PK Shop, New York


Exhibition Showcases Martin Weinstein's Collection


They Are Us: Animal Identity and the Anthropomorphic Urge

at Rick Wester Fine Art, New York


Roxana Marcoci Named Senior Curator at MoMA


Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, Acquires Manfred Heiting Photo Book Collection


Documerica Looks Back


Matthew Porter: Greet the Dust

at M+B Gallery, Los Angeles


George Tice: 60 Years of Photography

at Nailya Alexander Gallery, New York


September
Sebastiaan Bremer

at Edwynn Houk Gallery, New York


Carrie Mae Weems Is a MacArthur Genius


We Shall: Photographs by Paul D'Amato

at DePaul Art Museum, Chicago


She Who Tells a Story: Women Photographers from Iran and the Arab World

at Museum of Fine Arts, Boston


Malcolm Daniel Heading to Texas


Ryan McGinley: Yearbook

at Ratio 3, San Francisco


Brian Sholis Joins Cincinnati Art Museum


Pieter Hugo: Kin

at Yossi Milo Gallery, New York


Adieu to Le Journal de la Photographie


Nadia Sablin Wins Firecracker Photography Award


Getty Acquires Baltz Archive


August
Ray Metzker: Shadow Catcher

at Andrew Smith Gallery, Santa Fe


Guillermo Santos: La Ciudad Blanca

at Fotografica Bogota 2013,


The Getty Shares Its Collections


Inez & Vinoodh

at Gagosian Gallery (LA), Beverly Hills


July
Christian Houge: Shadow Within

at Hosfelt Gallery, San Francisco


Party Picks: Estate of Jimmy DeSana

at Salon 94 Bowery, New York


In The Studio

at John Messinger, East Hampton


That Which Is: Marcia Lippman

at KMR Arts, Washington Depot


Ben Lifson, 1941-2013


Jan Banning: Down and Out in the South

at Hagedorn Foundation Gallery, Atlanta


Tom Wood: Men and Women

at Thomas Erben Gallery, New York


From the Ground Up: The Tent Camera Photographs of Abelardo Morell

at Stephen Daiter Gallery, Chicago


Portion Control: Chrisopher Boffoli

at Winston Wachter Fine Art, New York


June
Bing Wright: Broken Mirror/Evening Sky

at James Harris Gallery, Seattle


A Different Kind of Order: The International Center of Photography Triennial

at International Center of Photography, New York


JR / Jose Parla, Wrinkles of the City, Havana Cuba

at Bryce Wolkowitz Gallery, New York


May
David Hilliard: The Tale is True

at Carroll And Sons, Boston


Japan's Modern Divide: Photographs by Hiroshi Hamaya and Kansuke Yamamoto

at Getty Center, Los Angeles


Michael Jang: The Jangs

at Stephen Wirtz Gallery, San Francisco


David Levinthal: War Games

at Corcoran Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C.


Mike Brodie's Period of Juvenile Prosperity


Spectator Sports

at Museum of Contemporary Photography, Chicago


Joshua Lutz: Hesitating Beauty

at ClampArt, New York


April
Shiprock and Mont St. Michel: Photographs by William Clift

at New Mexico Museum of Art, Santa Fe


Garry Winogrand

at SFMOMA, San Francisco


Liliana Porter: 1973

at Barbara Krakow Gallery, Boston


In The Studio

at Dillon DeWaters, Brooklyn


AIPAD's Photography Show


Bruce Davidson


March
Bill Brandt: Shadow and Light

at Museum of Modern Art, New York


Iwan Baan: The Way We Live

at Perry Rubenstein Gallery, Los Angeles


Suburbia

at Hagedorn Foundation Gallery, Atlanta


Julie Weitz

at The Suburban, Oak Park


Armory Show 2013

at Armory Show, New York


Scope New York 2013

at SCOPE New York, New York


ADAA Art Show 2013

at ADAA Art Show, New York


Shooting Stars: Publicity Stills from Early Hollywood and Portraits by Andy Warhol

at Corcoran Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C.


February
Topsy Turvy in Madison Square Park


JoAnn Verburg: Present Tense

at G. Gibson Gallery, Seattle


Miles Barth Joins Artnet


The Unphotographable

at Fraenkel Gallery, San Francisco


Katrina del Mar: Girls Girls Girls

at Participant, Inc., New York


Robin Rhode: Take Your Mind off the Street

at Lehmann Maupin (26th St), New York


Arne Svenson: The Neighbors

at Western Project, Culver City


January
Silvio Wolf: Us

at Bruce Silverstein Gallery, New York


Beat Memories: The Photographs of Allen Ginsberg

at Grey Art Gallery, New York


Katherine Bussard Named Curator at
Princeton Art Museum


Catherine Wagner: trans/literate.

at Stephen Wirtz Gallery, San Francisco


Karl Baden: Roadside Attractions

at Miller Yezerski Gallery, Boston


Viviane Sassen on View


January is for Hot Shots


Richard Pare: The Lost Vanguard: Soviet Modernist Architecture, 1922–32

at Graham Foundation, Chicago


2012
December
Faking it: Manipulated Photography Before Photoshop

at Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York


Idris Khan: New Photographs

at Fraenkel Gallery, San Francisco


Jessica Eaton: Polytopes

at M+B Gallery, Los Angeles


Nadav Kander: Yangtze: The Long River

at Flowers Gallery, New York


Ori Gersht: History Repeating

at Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, Boston


Attachments

at The Hole, New York


1979:1—2012:21: Jan Tichy Works with the MoCP Collection

at Museum of Contemporary Photography, Chicago


Bonni Benrubi, 1953-2012


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