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Phil Stern, 1919-2014


Photo by Genaro Molina / LA Times

Photographer Phil Stern died on December 13 in Los Angeles; he was 95 years old. A photographer for Life, Look, and other magazines, Stern was best known for photographing Hollywood legends and jazz musicians, including James Dean, John Wayne, Ella Fitzgerald, and Dizzy Gillespie. Stern began shooting for Life magazine in 1941 and also shot a number of album covers for the Verve, Pablo, and Reprise record labels.

 

— By Jean Dykstra  12/15/2014

Arthur Leipzig, 1918-2014


Photo by Arthur Leipzig, courtesy Howard Greenberg Gallery

Documentary photography Arthur Leipzig died on December 5; he was 96 years old. One of a group of socially minded photographers that included Helen Levitt, Roy DeCarava, and Gordon Parks, Leipzig photographed on the streets of New York, as well as in Sudan, Honduras, Ethiopia, and Puerto Rico, from the 1940s until the 1960s. His work was included in Edward Steichen’s landmark Family of Man exhibition at the Museum of Modern Art, and his book Growing Up in New York was published in 1995. Born in Brooklyn, Leipzig studied at The Photo League with Sid Grossman. He is survived by his wife of 72 years, his daughter, son, three grandsons and a great-granddaughter.

— By Jean Dykstra  12/08/2014

Eva Respini Moves to Boston's ICA


Photo by Martin Seck

Eva Respini, a curator of photography at the Museum of Modern Art, has been named Barbara Lee Chief Curator at the Institute of Contemporary Art, Boston. During her 15 years at MoMA, Respini curated the 2012 Cindy Sherman retrospective, the recent Robert Heinecken exhibition, as well as shows on Anne Collier and Leslie Hewitt, among others. Thematic exhibitions have included Pictures by Women, a photographic history of women artists, and Staging Action: Photography and Performance since 1960. Respini is currently working on a monograph on Walid Raad.

— By Jean Dykstra  12/05/2014

MoMA Shows Thomas Walther Collection


Max Burchartz, Lotte (Eye), 1928. Courtesy the Museum of Modern Art, Thomas Walther Collection

Object.Photo. Modern Photographs: The Thomas Walther Collection, 1909-1949 is the result of a four-year collaborative project between the departments of photography and conservation at the Museum of Modern Art. The project includes a Web site with in-depth information on each photograph and essays by scholars, which allows visitors to explore the collection; a hard-bound catalogue of the collection; an interdisciplinary symposium examining the way the digital age is changing our engagement with historical photographs; and an exhibition of select works from the collection. Modern Photographs from the Thomas Walther Collection, 1909-1949 opens December 13 in the Edward Steichen Galleries of the museum. The exhibition includes work by such photographers as Berenice Aboott, Karl Blossfeldt, Lucia Moholy, Laszlo Moholy-Nagy, and Paul Strand, among others.

 

— By Jean Dykstra  12/04/2014

Art Fairs in Miami


Art Basel Miami Beach

Warmer Climes Are Calling: Art Basel Miami Beach and the accompanying satellite fairs open their doors this week in Miami to thousands of dealers, collectors, curators, and artists. Art Basel Miami Beach, December 4-7, brings more than 250 art galleries this year, and last year some 75,000 visitors came to the fair. 

Art Miami, December 2- 7, the contemporary and modern art fair, celebrates its 25th edition this year with more than 125 international galleries. Its sister fair, CONTEXT Art Miami is dedicated to mid-career and emerging artists, with 75 galleries in the pavilion adjacent to the Art Miami pavilion.

Miami Project, one of six fairs produced by Art Market Productions takes place December 2-7 in Midtown Miami, and Red Dot Art Fair Miami, also December 2-7, returns to the Wynwood Art District with some 60 galleries showing photography, painting, and sculpture.

Also December 2-7, Scope Miami Beach, with more than 100 exhibitors and the fair’s Breeder Program, which introduces new galleries to the market. And Pulse Miami Beach, also December 4-7, moves to Indian Beach Park this year, for its tenth edition of showing cutting-edge, contemporary art.

And finally, a Miami fair just for photo lovers, the Miami Street Photography Festival, December 4-7 in the Wynwood Arts District, showcasing the best of contemporary street photography. Featured photographers this year are Susan Meiselas, Constantine Manos, Maggie Steber, Alex Webb, and Rebecca Norris Webb.

— By Jean Dykstra  12/01/2014

Lorenzo Vitturi: Dalston Anatomy

Yossi Milo Gallery, New York


Lorenzo Vitturi, Multicolor #1, 2013. ©Lorenzo Vitturi, courtesy Yossi Milo Gallery

Photography, the medium that began life as unflinching witness to the world, has long delighted in flexing its muscles in unexpected ways. This vibrant show by Venetian-born, UK-based photographer Lorenzo Vitturi presses it into ever-more supple positions: allowing it to function both as discrete, collectible art object and chameleon-like supporting character actor within a larger mise-en-scene. The result is this delightful, immersive show, on view at Yossi Milo through January 10, full of juicy color and formal rhythms, even as it takes on larger issues like identity, the conceptual limitations of portraiture, and class. 

Every aspect of Milo's white-box gallery space was pressed into service here: its cement columns festooned with such raucous detritus as striped tarp, plastic vegetable packing material, a coconut resting on a homemade shelf, and powdered pigment. Vitturi’s subject matter is the open-air Dalston Ridley Road market in East London. Its vendors are primarily of Caribbean and African descent, and the market is facing the threat of gentrification. You feel him thoroughly delighted by the many sights, smells, and sounds of the place as he takes the fruits and vegetables sold there back to his studio, where he pins them into anthropomorphic positions and photographs them before their eventual decay: nubbly brown breadfruit poked with wooden hair combs; an over-ripe banana supporting limbs of pale green berries and tomatoes. In the marketplace, all good things eventually rot and come to an end, so there’s more than a bit of the Vanitas in these exuberant constructions as well the weird humor of Archimboldo. 

Lorenzo Vitturi, Green Stripes #1, 2013. ©Lorenzo Vitturi, courtesy Yossi Milo Gallery

As for his more straight photographic portraits of people in the market, what the artist chooses to leave out is as interesting as what he depicts. More than 75 percent of the “portraits” here obscure their subject’s faces, blotting out one woman’s face with a dusting of bright yellow chalk; covering another man’s features with a scattering of tiny, sewing-drawer-type notions in a tutti-fruity palette. Exact identities are a mystery, but textures like clothing and jewelry and skin color are intact, forcing us to question how much we think we know about the inner life of people who come from worlds more seemingly exotic than our own. 

At first, learning that Vitturi is Venetian is almost startling. One senses how deeply he must have had to earn his sitters’ trust in order to involve them in an experiment so aestheticized without exploiting them. On further consideration, Venice is a romantic island culture we’ve all visited and think we know -- though we seldom befriend an indigenous resident. Co-option comes in many forms. And Vitturi certainly understands the beauty in decay.

 

— By Sarah Schmerler  12/01/2014

Larry Sultan: Here and Home

LACMA, Los Angeles


Larry Sultan, Discussion, Kitchen Table, 1985. ©Estate of Larry Sulton, courtesy the Estate of Larry Sultan

Larry Sultan’s father, Irving, hated the photograph of him sitting on his bed in a dark blue suit, tense, staring straight ahead. He put the suit on because his son, who had just begun photographing him obsessively, asked him to. He sat on the bed because he needed to rest. It was like being an actor on a film set, and then seeing cameras start to roll when you were taking a break--entirely unfair. It also was not a photograph about him. The New York Times obituary for Sultan, who died in 2009 at age 63, quotes Irving reprimanding his son: “[Y]ou tell people that that’s not me. . . . That’s you sitting on the bed.”

Sultan’s photographs of his father, and often his mother, in their Southern California home read as self-portraits even if you do not know how Irving felt. The point of looking so closely at his parents, quirky, charismatic and probably hot-tempered, seems to be to understand his own tastes and origins. Pictures from Home (1984-1994) may be the most memorable series Sultan ever did, and in the artist’s LACMA retrospective, organized by curator Rebecca Morse and on view through March 22, it’s hard to move on from the galleries that hold it. 

The first series you see when you enter the show, though, is Sultan’s final one, Homeland (2006-2009), of day laborers against suburban landscapes. He hired the laborers, then took them to vacant lots or un-landscaped yards in the San Fernando Valley. The lighting and staging is exquisite: men carrying dishes of food across an overgrown field in late afternoon sun, men standing languorously, staring out of a batting cage mid-day. But the sentimental prettiness would give the wrong impression of why he is an interesting artist. His sense of light, color, and composition were, in his best work, not the main point but tools to give intimate views into strange, specific worlds. 

Larry Sultan, Boxers, Mission Hills, 1999. ©Estate of Larry Sultan, courtesy the Estate of Larry Sulton

Pictures from Home follows Homeland, then transitions into Evidence. A project Sultan completed in the late 1970s with artist Mike Mandel, Evidence involved requesting access to multiple government and corporate archives then culling them for compelling images of politicians, fires or medical patients. The artists sequenced the photographs and then published them in a book that included no contextual information. It became a landmark in conceptual photography, delving deep into strangeness and privileging uncanny, intuitive associations over authorship and narrative.

The show’s final few galleries feature, among other things, The Valley, photographs of porn stars and their surroundings. Sultan, who began this project in the late1990s, would spend all day on set, getting bored but also becoming more familiar with the details: the way an actress holds her robe shut between shoots, the weirdness of neighbors’ windows facing a set. 

It is rare that ordering a show chronologically actually seems like the better option. But in this case, it might have been more affecting to start at the beginning, to see Sultan and Mandel grappling with how to represent “official” documentation of their cultural moment; then to see Sultan mining his perceptions of his parents; then on to porn sets and flashy stars. After spending time in these self-contained worlds Sultan excavated, you would encounter the measured beauty of Homeland, with the laborers traversing landscapes, and you might be better primed to appreciate the photographer’s urge to zoom out on bigger vistas.

 

— By Catherine Wagley  11/26/2014

Lewis Baltz, 1945-2014


©David Kregenow

Lewis Baltz, the influential photographer whose work was included in the landmark exhibition New Topographics: Photographs of a Man-altered Landscape at the George Eastman House in 1975, died on November 23. Baltz grew up in Newport Beach, California, but he spent his last years between Paris and Venice. He was one of the most important figures in the New Topographics movement in photography in the 1960s and ‘70s, which redefined the parameters of landscape photography in terms of a minimal approach that often examined suburban sprawl.

— By Jean Dykstra  11/25/2014

Fahey/Klein Opens New Space


William Claxton, Chet Baker (Piano), Hollywood, 1954. Courtesy Fahey/Klein Gallery

The Los Angeles-based Fahey/Klein Gallery is opening a second location in Miami, with an inaugural exhibition opening December 4. The opening show will be a group exhibition including such photographers as Henri Cartier-Bresson, Elliott Erwitt, William Klein, Ellen von Unwerth, and Danny Lyon, among others, coinciding with Art Basel Miami (December 4-7). A special portfolio of photographs by William Claxton will be on view, including images of Hollywood celebrities, jazz musicians, and fashion icons.

— By Jean Dykstra  11/24/2014

RISC Benefit Auction Open Now


Photo by Tim Hetherington

The RISC Silent Auction is open now and concludes on December 3, at a Benefit Auction at Aperture Gallery at 6:30. RISC (Reporters Instructed in Saving Colleagues) was founded by Sebastian Junger and is dedicated to training journalists in all media to treat life-threatening injuries on the battlefield. RISC training is provided free of cost to experienced, published freelance conflict journalists, and the proceeds from the Benefit Auction will go toward the training of more journalists.

The auction features a short program by Sebastian Junger and Magnum photographer Susan Meiselas, hors d'oeuvres and beverages, an work by 46 photographers, including Meiselas, the late Tim Hetherington, Richard Mosse, Roger Ballen, Michael Kamber, and Gillian Laub, among many others.

 

— By Jean Dykstra  11/21/2014

Orit Raff: Priming

Julie Saul Gallery, New York


Orit Raff, Special Topics in Calamity Physics, 2013. Courtesy Julie Saul Gallery

In Orit Raff’s photographs of rooms and interior spaces, on view at Julie Saul through December 6, beams of sunlight fall across a floor, and lamplight softly illuminates the corner of a bedroom. Light – that essential tool of photography – is a living, breathing entity in her works, creating the mood and setting the emotional temperature. But these images are not what they seem. For one thing, they are not photographs, and that evanescent light is a digital manifestation, not a record of the real thing. Raff fabricated these images entirely in a computer, using architectural and photo-editing software. The 13 works on view depict rooms or spaces in different novels, ranging from classics such as Madame Bovary to contemporary works such as Jonathan Franzen’s Freedom.  They also play with conventions of photography in the oblique but thoughtful way that has characterized Raff’s work. 

Raff conjured these spaces with exacting precision after immersing herself in the novels, placing details like the rope clutched by the newly blind Jose Saramago’s Blindness, or the Bob Dylan poster and the Pepsi bottle in the room from Jonathan Franzen’s Freedom. Deftly borrowing visual tropes from architectural and documentary photography, she encourages us to read the pictures as facts. Then she slyly pulls apart the indexical character photography.

Orit Raff, Blindness, 2013. Courtesy Julie Saul Gallery

Raff’s previous series also explored space and architecture. White focused on domestic objects -- a soap dish, a bathroom sink, a drain – and the evidence left there of human habitation. Mobius Strip depicted on the indentations in carpets and other surfaces in recently vacated apartments that suggested the way the space was laid out when it was occupied.  She has also photographed old wooden desktops from schools that bear the marks of generations of schoolchildren’s scribbles and doodles. 

Priming takes her interest in the traces left by people one step further. As curator Lauri Firstenberg commented in an interview with Raff in 2005, the artist seems to approach her subject sideways, through surrogates – places, objects, and traces, rather than the thing itself. In these images, she sidles into an exploration of memory  – her own memory of a place she imagined while engaged in a story, and perhaps viewers’ memories as well. But whether the viewer has read the books or not, these images are full of possibility and tension, percolating with narrative potential.

 

— By Jean Dykstra  11/19/2014

Lucien Clergue, 1934-2014


©Jean-Marie Perier

French photographer Lucien Clergue died on November 15, at the age of 80. A photographer and champion of the medium, he founded Les Rencontres d'Arles in 1970, one of the forerunners of the many art fairs today. In 2006, he was the first photographer elected to France's Académie des Beaux-Arts. 

Clergue, who was born in Arles, was only 19 when he approached Pablo Picasso at a bullfight in Arles to show the famous artist his photographs. Picasso was impressed, and a 30-year friendship was born. Clergue is known for his nudes and landscapes and well as photographs of bullfighting and of Picasso and his circle. On the occasion of Clergue’s 80th birthday in July, l’Oeil de la Photographie devoted an entire issue to him, which has been republished in his memory.

— By Jean Dykstra  11/17/2014

Sandro Miller: Malkovich, Malkovich, Malkovich: Homage to Photographic Masters

Catherine Edelman Gallery, Chicago


Sandro Miller, Andres Serrano / Piss Christ (1987), 2014. ©Sandro Miller, courtesy Catherine Edelman Gallery

There are few somebodies who can become anybody. John Malkovich is one of them. The actor’s 60-year-old face shape-shifts its way through art history in Sandro Miller’s Malkovich, Malkovich, Malkovich: Homage To Photographic Masters at Catherine Edelman Gallery (through January 31, 2015). Famed portraits by Avedon, Mapplethorpe, Penn, and Warhol, among others, are simulated by Sandro, himself a master persona-maker for more than 30 years, and Malkovich. The hilarious images smack of heartfelt collaboration.

The two artists met in Chicago while working at the Steppenwolf Theatre, Malkovich on stage and Sandro shooting playbills. Apparently the idea for the series sprang from Sandro’s gigantic library of photo books—he is self-taught—and the two men reenact some of the 20th century’s most iconic, beautiful, and strange photographic portraits. Dorothea Lange’s 1936 Migrant Mother and Diane Arbus’s 1967 twins are popular favorites. Malkovich as Christ submerged in piss shocks anew.

Sandro Miller, Dorothea Lange / Migrant Mother, Nipomo, California (1936), 2014. ©Sandro Miller, courtesy Catherine Edelman Gallery

Ultimately, Malkovich’s face and its encyclopedia of expressions dominate each scene’s flawless mimesis. But this is John Malkovich, not some Everyman Actor. One no longer sees Malkovich the man (whoever he is) but that which Malkovich’s face has come to signify: a metaphysics of identity. 

The series is not just a nightmare where everything you love has been replaced with the face of a monkey; rather, Sandro’s work with Malkovich demonstrates icon fantasy. These are the saints of art history transformed by Sandro’s—and our—obsession with masterpieces and geniuses. Even as millions of personal images circulate the globe daily, it is likely that only a few will define you. Such is the paradox and power of images in the celebrity age.

The reenactments hit a high note of performance energy. Malkovich soars. The sets and costuming are impeccable. Perhaps the series will not be as eternal as their sources, but they remain a curious delicacy in the oeuvres of Sandro and Malkovich.

— By Jason Foumberg  11/15/2014

Paris Photo-Aperture PhotoBook Awards


The winners of the Paris Photo-Aperture Foundation PhotoBook Awards were announced in Paris on November 14: Hidden Islam by Nicoló Degiorgis is the winner of $10,000 in the First PhotoBook category. The award for a new category this year, Photography Catalogue of the Year, went to a set of catalogues, Christopher Williams: The Production Line of Happiness and Christopher Williams: Printed in Germany. Imaginary Club by Oliver Sieber is the winner of PhotoBook of the Year. A special mention in that category goes to Vytautas V. Stanionis’s Photographs for Documents.

— By Jean Dykstra  11/14/2014

Sunil Gupta: Out and About: New York and New Delhi

sepiaEYE, New York


Sunil Gupta, Untitled #21, from Christopher Street, 1976. Courtesy Sunil Gupta and sepiaEYE

On the surface, the two bodies of work in Sunil Gupta's exhibition, Out and About: New York and New Delhi, on view at sepiaEYE through December 20, have a lot in common. In both Christopher Street and Mr. Malhotra's Party, Gupta explores queer presence in public spaces. But context is crucial, and ultimately the series, separated by place and more than 30 years, reveal key differences, opening up an intriguing conversation about freedom and identity. 

Christopher Street, like much of Gupta's work, straddles the personal and the political. In 1976 Gupta abandoned a master’s program in business administration in New York City to pursue photography education at the New School. His photos of fellow gay men on Christopher Street from this period may be seen not only as a reflection of the gay liberation movement taking hold at the time, but Gupta's own "coming out" as an artist.

The Village was a revelation to Gupta, who'd never seen a place where sexuality was so openly expressed. His enthrallment shows in his photographs, in which his camera acts as a proxy for his own wandering, curious eye. His subjects, pictured in black and white walking the streets of the gay haven, are mostly unaware that they're being photographed, and perhaps equally heedless of their own unprecedented freedom.

Sunil Gupta, Bikram, India Gate, 2007, from Mr. Malhotra's Party. Courtesy Sunil Gupta and sepiaEYE

Mr. Malhotra's Party, taken more than 30 years later, reveals the luxury of that freedom by comparison. In Delhi, where the photos were taken, centuries-old anti-sodomy laws were only struck down in 2009, two years after Gupta began taking photos of queer people around the city (the laws were re-instated in 2013). There are no gay bars in the city; gatherings for queer people are advertised as private parties under the name of a host.

In this political environment, a queer person posing for the camera is a conscious act of defiance, one that Gupta instigated with friends and acquaintances for the photographs. His subjects face the camera directly, as though challenging those who oppose them. Their expressions are powerful and moving.

Taken together, these photos speak to the variety of experiences in gay communities, but they also tell a story about the development of a photographer and activist. While he is an anonymous, wide-eyed observer in the Village, Gupta shows himself to be an active dissenter in Delhi, driven to create a world in which, one day, perhaps, images of gay life in the West and the East might not look so different.  

 

 

 

— By Jordan G. Teicher  11/13/2014

archives

2014
December
Phil Stern, 1919-2014


Arthur Leipzig, 1918-2014


Eva Respini Moves to Boston's ICA


MoMA Shows Thomas Walther Collection


Art Fairs in Miami


Lorenzo Vitturi: Dalston Anatomy

at Yossi Milo Gallery, New York


November
Larry Sultan: Here and Home

at LACMA, Los Angeles


Lewis Baltz, 1945-2014


Fahey/Klein Opens New Space


RISC Benefit Auction Open Now


Orit Raff: Priming

at Julie Saul Gallery, New York


Lucien Clergue, 1934-2014


Sandro Miller: Malkovich, Malkovich, Malkovich: Homage to Photographic Masters

at Catherine Edelman Gallery, Chicago


Paris Photo-Aperture PhotoBook Awards


Sunil Gupta: Out and About: New York and New Delhi

at sepiaEYE, New York


Builder Levy: Photographer

at Arnika Dawkins Gallery, Atlanta


Mayumi Lake: Latent Heat

at Miyako Yoshinaga Gallery, New York


Special Sale of Magnum Photos


New Space for Foley Gallery


Juan Fernando Herrán Win Prix Pictet Commission


Maurice Ortega to Head Curatorial Assistance


October
David Armstrong, 1954-2014


Lucie Awards Announced


New Home for Camera Club of NY


Philip Gefter Publishes Biography of Sam Wagstaff


Fred Ritchin New Dean at ICP


C/O Berlin Opens in Amerika Haus


René Burri, 1933-2014


Joseph Sywenkyj Wins Eugene Smith Grant


United States Artist Fellowships Announced


Ray Metzker, 1931-2014


Lois Conner: The Long View

at Gitterman Gallery, New York


Howard Greenberg / Steidl


Magic on Earth: Jean-Claude Moschetti

at M.I.A. Gallery, Seattle


Blind Spot | Griffin Editions Project Space


Shannon Ebner: Public Surface Pattern

at Altman Siegel Gallery, San Francisco


Ruud van Empel: New Work

at Jackson Fine Art, Atlanta


Getty Acquires Chris Killip Photographs


Samuel Fosso

at Walther Collection Project Space, New York


September
Yvonne Venegas: San Pedro Garza Garcia

at Shoshana Wayne Gallery, Santa Monica


Guarapuava: Valdir Cruz

at Throckmorton Fine Art, New York


ICP to Bowery


Whitney Museum Gets Major Photography Gift


Amon Carter Museum Digitizes Trove of Artworks


Climate Week NYC at ICP


Filter Photo Festival


Richard Mosse at Indianapolis Museum of Contemporary Art


Ernest Cole: Photographer

at Grey Art Gallery, New York


August Sander: Just Women / Jess T. Dugan: Every Breath We Drew

at Gallery Kayafas, Boston


August
Photo Shanghai Debuts


Kasher|Potamkin Launches New Gallery/Boutique


July
Wynn Bullock: Revelations

at High Museum of Art, Atlanta


Where There's Smoke. John Gossage: Who Do You Love

at Fraenkel Gallery, San Francisco


Allan Sekula: Ship of Fools

at Christopher Grimes Gallery, Santa Monica


Cantor Art Center Receives Warhol Archive


Jack Leigh: Full Circle, Low Country Photographs, 1972-2004

at SCAD Museum of Art, Savannah


Josef Koudelka: Nationality Doubtful

at Art Institute of Chicago, Chicago


Stephen Wirtz Gallery Closing


Justin Kimball: Where We Find Ourselves

at Carroll And Sons, Boston


Jacques Sonck: Archetypes

at L. Parker Stephenson Photographs, New York


The Invisible Photograph


Getty Acquires Robert McElroy Archive


Oresick Joins Silver Eye Center


Liz Deschenes Awarded Rappaport Prize


New Avedon App


Bonjour Arles!


Doug Hall: Bodies in Space

at Benrubi Gallery, New York


Cahiers d'Art Devoted to Sugimoto


Photo Espana Prize Goes to Aitor Lara


June
Anthony Friedkin: The Gay Essay

at de Young Museum, San Francisco


2014 Prix HSBC Awarded to Two Photographers


Rudolf Kicken, 1947-2014


"Biggest Photography Class in History"


Puppies and Pictures


Domesticated: Photographs by Amy Stein

at National Academy of Sciences, Washington


Steel Stillman: Incidents, 1969-2014

at Show Room Gowanus, Brooklyn


Callahan Collection Donated to Vancouver Art Gallery


Brandon Thibodeaux Wins Michael P. Smith Grant


Roger Mayne, 1929-2014


The Fence Goes on View in Brooklyn


Ka-Man Tse Wins Robert Giard Fellowship


Multiple Exposures: Jewelry and Photography / The Embroidered Image

at Museum of Arts and Design / Robert Mann Gallery, New York


Tim Barber: Relations

at Capricious 88, New York


May
Michael Flomen: Wild Nights

at Boite Noire Gallery, West Hollywood


Sze Tsung Leong: Horizons

at Yossi Milo Gallery, New York


Portland Art Museum Acquires Robert Adams Photographs


Michael Schmidt, 1945-2014


Paul Anthony Smith: Mangos and Crab

at Carrie Secrist Gallery, Chicago


Michael Schmidt Wins Prix Pictet


Jaimie Warren

at SF Camerawork, San Francisco


Symposium at Getty Celebrates 175th Anniversary of Photography


Zoe Leonard Receives Buckbaum Award


Andre Serrano Creates Public Art Project


Luigi Ghirri: La Città

at Matthew Marks Gallery (LA), Los Angeles


Richard Mosse Wins Deutsche Börse Prize


Poetics of Light: Pinhole Photography

at New Mexico History Museum, Santa Fe


Prix Pictet Finalists On View at V&A


Richard Renaldi: Touching Strangers / This Grand Show


Hillman Photography Initiative Explores Future of Photography


Walking in Their Shoes


Mark Ruwedel Wins Scotiabank Photography Award


April
Gabor Kerekes, 1945-2014


Major Gifts to High Museum


Hiroshi Sugimoto Wins Isamu Noguchi Prize


Carolle Bénitah: Photos-Souvenirs

at Sous Les Etoiles Gallery, New York


A New Space for Photo-Eye


Maroesjka Lavigne: Island

at Robert Mann Gallery, New York


George Dureau, 1931-2014


More AIPAD Picks from Elisabeth Biondi


Elisabeth Biondi's AIPAD Picks


Sarah Schmerler's Picks from AIPAD


2014 Guggenheim Fellowships


Lisa Sette Relocating


Photo Eye: Avant-Garde Photography in Europe

at Museum of Fine Arts, Boston


Lower East Side Photo Walk


Roe Ethridge: Sacrifice Your Body

at Andrew Kreps Gallery, New York


March
Laurie Simmons: Kigurumi, Dollers and How We See

at Salon 94 Bowery, New York


Getty Museum Acquires Tress Photographs


Amy Elkins Wins Aperture Portfolio Prize


Moutoussamy-Ashe Photos Go to Smithsonian


Walead Beshty: Selected Bodies of Work

at Regen Projects, Los Angeles


Public Intimacy: Art and Other Ordinary Acts in South Africa

at Yerba Buena Center for the Arts, San Francisco


Prince/Cariou Case Settled


Daniel Gordon Wins Paul Huf Award


New Photo Gallery in Williamsburg


ICP on the Move


National Gallery of Art Receives Gift of Photographs


Jamie Warren Wins Baum Award


Chloe Dewe Mathews Wins Gardner Fellowship


Matthew Pillsbury: Nate and Me

at Sasha Wolf Gallery, New York


Getty Images Opens Up Library


Paula McCartney: A Field Guide to Snow and Ice

at Klompching Gallery, Brooklyn


American Cool

at National Portrait Gallery, Washington, D.C.


February
Steichen/Warhol: Picturing Fame

at Block Museum of Art, Evanston


ICP Announces Infinity Award Winners


Onward in Philly


Samuel Fosso Photographs Rescued


J. Shimon & J. Lindemann: We Go From Where We Know

at John Michael Kohler Art Center, Sheboygan


John Stanmeyer Wins World Press Photo Award


Not Your Grandmother's Librarian


Patrick Nagatani: Outer and Inner: Contemplations on the Physical and the Spiritual

at Andrew Smith Gallery (annex), Santa Fe


New Photo Gallery in Boston


Fred McDarrah: Save the Village

at Steven Kasher Gallery, New York


J.D. 'Okhai Ojeikere, 1930-2014


Kevin Cooley and Phillip Andrew Lewis: Unexplored Territory

at Kopeikin Gallery, Los Angeles


January
Public Art Project Highlights the Boroughs


Carrie Mae Weems: Three Decades of Photography and Video

at Guggenheim Museum, New York


Getty Acquires Pictorialist Photographs


Peter Hujar: Love & Lust

at Fraenkel Gallery, San Francisco


Child Identified in 1908 Lewis Hine Photo


Heather Snider Joins SF Camerawork


The Sochi Project: An Atlas of War and Tourism in the Caucasus

at DePaul Art Museum, Chicago


Phillip Prodger Joins London's National Portrait Gallery


Tanya Marcuse: Fallen

at Julie Saul Gallery, New York


Joshua Chuang Joins CCP


Sophie Calle: Last Seen

at Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum, Boston


Danielle Durchslag: Relative Unknowns

at Denny Gallery, New York


Carnegie Museum Founds Hillman Photography Initiative


Soo Kim Awarded Gutmann Fellowship


Symposium on March on Washington


2013
December
November
Balthus: The Last Studies

at Gagosian Gallery (Mad Ave), New York


Saul Leiter, 1923-2013


Maine Philanthropists Give Collection to Portland Museum of Art


Daniel Morel Wins Suit Against Getty Images/AFP


Sean McFarland: Glass Mountains

at Stephen Wirtz Gallery, San Francisco


John Divola: As Far As I Could get

at Santa Barbara Museum of Art, LACMA, Pomona Museum of Art,


Eileen Quinlan: Curtains

at Miguel Abreu Gallery, New York


ICP Names New Executive Director


Clarence John Laughlin Award Announced


Prix Pictet Shortlist Announced


And the Winner Is ....


Libération's Powerful Homage to Photography


Tanja Hollander: The Landscapes of Are You Really My Friend?

at Carroll And Sons, Boston


War/Photography: Images of Armed Conflict and its Aftermath

at Brooklyn Museum of Art, Brooklyn


Lisa Hostetler to Eastman House


Dispatched to Texas


Finding Vivian Maier


Queens Museum Reopens with Photos by Jeff Chien-Hsing Liao


New E-Book from Library of Congress


Hello, Goodbye


October
Iké Udé: Style and Sympathies

at Leila Heller Gallery, New York


Deborah Turbeville, 1932-2013


ICP Celebrates Robert Capa's Centenary


Of Walking

at Museum of Contemporary Photography, Chicago


Here is New York


Polly Borland: You

at PK Shop, New York


Exhibition Showcases Martin Weinstein's Collection


They Are Us: Animal Identity and the Anthropomorphic Urge

at Rick Wester Fine Art, New York


Roxana Marcoci Named Senior Curator at MoMA


Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, Acquires Manfred Heiting Photo Book Collection


Documerica Looks Back


Matthew Porter: Greet the Dust

at M+B Gallery, Los Angeles


George Tice: 60 Years of Photography

at Nailya Alexander Gallery, New York


September
Sebastiaan Bremer

at Edwynn Houk Gallery, New York


Carrie Mae Weems Is a MacArthur Genius


We Shall: Photographs by Paul D'Amato

at DePaul Art Museum, Chicago


She Who Tells a Story: Women Photographers from Iran and the Arab World

at Museum of Fine Arts, Boston


Malcolm Daniel Heading to Texas


Ryan McGinley: Yearbook

at Ratio 3, San Francisco


Brian Sholis Joins Cincinnati Art Museum


Pieter Hugo: Kin

at Yossi Milo Gallery, New York


Adieu to Le Journal de la Photographie


Nadia Sablin Wins Firecracker Photography Award


Getty Acquires Baltz Archive


August
Ray Metzker: Shadow Catcher

at Andrew Smith Gallery, Santa Fe


Guillermo Santos: La Ciudad Blanca

at Fotografica Bogota 2013,


The Getty Shares Its Collections


Inez & Vinoodh

at Gagosian Gallery (LA), Beverly Hills


July
Christian Houge: Shadow Within

at Hosfelt Gallery, San Francisco


Party Picks: Estate of Jimmy DeSana

at Salon 94 Bowery, New York


In The Studio

at John Messinger, East Hampton


That Which Is: Marcia Lippman

at KMR Arts, Washington Depot


Ben Lifson, 1941-2013


Jan Banning: Down and Out in the South

at Hagedorn Foundation Gallery, Atlanta


Tom Wood: Men and Women

at Thomas Erben Gallery, New York


From the Ground Up: The Tent Camera Photographs of Abelardo Morell

at Stephen Daiter Gallery, Chicago


Portion Control: Chrisopher Boffoli

at Winston Wachter Fine Art, New York


June
Bing Wright: Broken Mirror/Evening Sky

at James Harris Gallery, Seattle


A Different Kind of Order: The International Center of Photography Triennial

at International Center of Photography, New York


JR / Jose Parla, Wrinkles of the City, Havana Cuba

at Bryce Wolkowitz Gallery, New York


May
David Hilliard: The Tale is True

at Carroll And Sons, Boston


Japan's Modern Divide: Photographs by Hiroshi Hamaya and Kansuke Yamamoto

at Getty Center, Los Angeles


Michael Jang: The Jangs

at Stephen Wirtz Gallery, San Francisco


David Levinthal: War Games

at Corcoran Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C.


Mike Brodie's Period of Juvenile Prosperity


Spectator Sports

at Museum of Contemporary Photography, Chicago


Joshua Lutz: Hesitating Beauty

at ClampArt, New York


April
Shiprock and Mont St. Michel: Photographs by William Clift

at New Mexico Museum of Art, Santa Fe


Garry Winogrand

at SFMOMA, San Francisco


Liliana Porter: 1973

at Barbara Krakow Gallery, Boston


In The Studio

at Dillon DeWaters, Brooklyn


AIPAD's Photography Show


Bruce Davidson


March
Bill Brandt: Shadow and Light

at Museum of Modern Art, New York


Iwan Baan: The Way We Live

at Perry Rubenstein Gallery, Los Angeles


Suburbia

at Hagedorn Foundation Gallery, Atlanta


Julie Weitz

at The Suburban, Oak Park


Armory Show 2013

at Armory Show, New York


Scope New York 2013

at SCOPE New York, New York


ADAA Art Show 2013

at ADAA Art Show, New York


Shooting Stars: Publicity Stills from Early Hollywood and Portraits by Andy Warhol

at Corcoran Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C.


February
Topsy Turvy in Madison Square Park


JoAnn Verburg: Present Tense

at G. Gibson Gallery, Seattle


Miles Barth Joins Artnet


The Unphotographable

at Fraenkel Gallery, San Francisco


Katrina del Mar: Girls Girls Girls

at Participant, Inc., New York


Robin Rhode: Take Your Mind off the Street

at Lehmann Maupin (Chelsea), New York


Arne Svenson: The Neighbors

at Western Project, Culver City


January
Silvio Wolf: Us

at Bruce Silverstein Gallery, New York


Beat Memories: The Photographs of Allen Ginsberg

at Grey Art Gallery, New York


Katherine Bussard Named Curator at
Princeton Art Museum


Catherine Wagner: trans/literate.

at Stephen Wirtz Gallery, San Francisco


Karl Baden: Roadside Attractions

at Miller Yezerski Gallery, Boston


Viviane Sassen on View


January is for Hot Shots


Richard Pare: The Lost Vanguard: Soviet Modernist Architecture, 1922–32

at Graham Foundation, Chicago


2012
December
Faking it: Manipulated Photography Before Photoshop

at Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York


Idris Khan: New Photographs

at Fraenkel Gallery, San Francisco


Jessica Eaton: Polytopes

at M+B Gallery, Los Angeles


Nadav Kander: Yangtze: The Long River

at Flowers, New York


Ori Gersht: History Repeating

at Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, Boston


Attachments

at The Hole, New York


1979:1—2012:21: Jan Tichy Works with the MoCP Collection

at Museum of Contemporary Photography, Chicago


Bonni Benrubi, 1953-2012


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