photograph, photograph magazine, photograph listings, photograph reviews, photograph exhibitions, photograph opening receptions, photograph resources, New York

Amon Carter Museum Digitizes Trove of Artworks


Laura Gilpin, Steps of the Castillo, Chichen Itza, 1932. Courtesy Amon Carter Museum of American Art

The Amon Carter Museum of American Art in Fort Worth, Texas, has digitized and catalogued more than 35,000 artworks by eight prominent American photographers -- Carlotta Corpron (1901–1988), Nell Dorr (1893–1988), Laura Gilpin (1891–1979), Eliot Porter (1901–1990), Helen Post (1907–1979), Clara Sipprell (1885–1975), Erwin E. Smith (1886–1947) and Karl Struss (1886–1981) – and put the works online. The project was made possible by a $75,000 digitization grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities in 2012.

 

— By Jean Dykstra  09/19/2014

Climate Week NYC at ICP


 

© Sebastião Salgado/Amazonas images—Contact Press Images.

The International Center of Photography is hosting a series of exhibitions, film screenings, lectures and panels beginning with Climate Week NYC, from September 22-28. The series of events launches with the exhibition Sebastiao Salgado: Genesis, on view through January 11, and continues with talks and presentations into December, from Photography and the Environment 1: The Concerned Photographer on September 29 to Confronting Climate Change on November 17.

— By Jean Dykstra  09/19/2014

Filter Photo Festival


Greg Stimac, Old Faithful Inversion, 2012, showing at the Museum of Contemporary Photography, Chicago

The Filter Photo Festival takes place in Chicago from September 24 to 28, with portfolio reviews, workshops, exhibitions, and lectures. The festival will include lectures by Carrie Mae Weems and Eli Reed; a tour of the exhibition Phantoms in the Dirt by guest curator Karsten Lund; and a gallery walk in the River North district.

 

— By Jean Dykstra  09/19/2014

Richard Mosse at Indianapolis Museum of Contemporary Art


Richard Mosse, from Fermata. Courtesy Indianapolis Museum of Contemporary Art

The Indianapolis Museum of Contemporary Art is opening its new City Way location, at 215 East South Street, with Richard Mosse’s Fermata. The show opens October 3, with a reception from 6 to 11 pm and a free concert by Helado Negro at 9 pm. Mosse, the winner of the 2014 Deutsche Borse Photography Prize, used discontinued infrared reconnaissance film to photograph the ongoing conflict in the Congo for his series Fermata.

 

— By Jean Dykstra  09/19/2014

Ernest Cole: Photographer

Grey Art Gallery, New York


Ernest Cole, Earnest boy squats on haunches and strains to follow lesson in heat of packed classroom, 1967. ©The Ernest Cole Family Trust, courtesy the Hasselblad Foundation

In 2011, the South African National Gallery in Capetown was devoted to the work of two photographers and both responded in very different ways to the realities of what was once a divided country: Roger Ballen and Ernest Cole (1940-1990).  Ballen was already internationally recognized in art circles for an expressionistic, theatrical style that explored the idea of marginality in South African society.  Cole (who died just after the release of Nelson Mandela) was almost unknown.  No significant exhibition of his work had ever been presented in the United States – or in South Africa, for that matter. The exhibition in South Africa was mounted by Sweden’s Hasselbald Foundation, which houses the Cole archive, and that is substantially the show at the Grey Art Gallery through December 6.  Having been conditioned by many books and exhibitions of anti-apartheid photojournalism, viewers might miss the enormous significance of these pictures.  If some of these black-and-white photos of life under pass laws and segregated facilities seem familiar, it is because Cole set the standard for showing life behind racial barriers.

Born in a township near Pretoria, Cole worked for black publications, but all the while he nursed a project he hoped would reveal the true character of apartheid, in pictures that could never be published in South Africa.  In 1966 he was arrested in connection with a street gang he was photographing.  Under pressure to give information, he somehow managed to obtain a passport and leave the country.  He never returned.  He spent parts of the next 25 years in Sweden, London, and New York, where his life spiraled downward.  He became homeless, possibly the result of bipolar disorder, and he died of pancreatic cancer.  

Ernest Cole. ©The Ernest Cole Family Trust, courtesy the Hasselblad Foundation

The essence of his work, House of Bondage, was published as a book in 1967.  This exhibition presents the photographs as Cole would have wanted, uncropped, with his captions. More importantly, they reveal a photographer, not simply a man with a message. Cole’s model was Henri Cartier-Bresson, and the political power of Cole’s images resides precisely in his commitment to portraying lives as lived, in a place where even the ordinary moments are decisive.  Among the many powerful images of discrimination and displacement, I am more drawn to quiet pictures that convey the texture of apartheid from the inside: two black women eating grapes on the lawn of a middle-class house, just beyond a wall bordering the front garden.  It seems so benign, but Cole tells us that as servants, blacks were not allowed to receive any visitors on their employers’ premises, and so had to meet people away from the houses, near the street.  Closer to invisibility.  Piercing this invisibility was Cole’s great achievement. 

— By Lyle Rexer  09/18/2014

August Sander: Just Women / Jess T. Dugan: Every Breath We Drew

Gallery Kayafas, Boston


August Sander, Painter's Wife (Helen Abelen), 1926. Courtesy Gallery Kayafas

Halfway through Virginia Woolf’s 1928 novel Orlando, an extraordinary thing happens: he becomes a she. This gender-bending character romps through centuries of shifting cultural and sexual expectations, and an exhibition at Gallery Kayafas through October 11 covers similar terrain. A selection of portraits of women by August Sander, culled from his monumental 1920s series Citizens of the Twentieth Century is paired with contemporary photographer Jess T. Dugan’s large color explorations of herself and others enacting carefully constructed masculine identities.

Both photographers dig below the surface of identity to mine instances where body language, clothing, and environment foster a sympathetic connection to the individual.  A rich conversation ensues among the photographs, concerning the slippery nature of masculine or feminine archetypes. Dresses were the conventional uniform of the day for Sander’s subject, but his Painter's Wife defies this norm: she wears a white shirt, trousers, and a tie. Clenching a cigarette between her teeth and striking a match, she exudes an aggressive power without sacrificing any of her female sophistication. Across the room, Dugan’s Self portrait (muscle shirt) offers another side of the same coin. With muscled arms stretched overhead, Dugan flirts with the camera in a beefcake pose that oozes self-assurance and virility, minus the machismo. 

Jess T. Dugan, Self-portrait (muscle shirt), 2013. Courtesy Gallery Kayafas

Dugan strives to form an intimate connection with her subjects to present their gentle, introspective sides, and Sander is a worthy teacher. He had an extraordinary knack for eliciting a deep humanity from a wide range of subjects. Two Small town women, classically dressed in white embroidered dresses, are shown sharing tea in their parlor. Details such as tousled hair, bemused expressions and two paintings, one askew that hang on the wall behind them, suggest a little mayhem below the surface of their proper dresses. 

 

— By Edie Bresler  09/17/2014

Photo Shanghai Debuts


Robert Polidori, Green Car, Havana, 1997. Courtesy Camera Work, Berlin

The Asia-Pacific region gets its own international photography fair when Photo Shanghai debuts September 5-7. Located in the Shanghai Exhibition Centre, the fair is directed by Alexander Montague-Sparey, previously head of photographs at Christie’s London. With some 40 photography galleries from around the world, the fair will also include talks by photographers Roger Ballen, Birdhead, and Martin Parr and a panel on the Chinese Photo Book and a panel on Chinese contemporary photography (with ICP curator Chris Phillips and artist RongDong), among others.

 

— By Jean Dykstra  08/31/2014

Kasher|Potamkin Launches New Gallery/Boutique


Delphine Diallo, Hybrid IV, 2011. Courtesy Kasher|Potamkin

Launching in September, a new gallery/boutique run by veteran photography dealer Steven Kasher and Andi Potamkin, proprietor of the fashionable hair salon Three Squares Studio, on 17th Street in Chelsea.  Kasher, who is known for showing documentary and fashion photography, collaborated with Potamkin on a show of photographs by Phyllis Galembo at Three Squares Studio in 2012. That successful show led to the formation of Kasher|Potamkin, located at 515 West 26th Street in the same space as the Steven Kasher Gallery. The boutique, offering artworks, furniture, and accessories, opens September 6 with the exhibition Intangible Beauty: Beautiful Women and the Endless Void, including photographs by Vee Speers, Marianna Rothen, Delphine Diallo, furniture by the Haas Brothers, and vases and objects by Michael Verheyden.

 

— By Jean Dykstra  08/25/2014

Wynn Bullock: Revelations

High Museum of Art, Atlanta


Wynn Bullock, Photogram, 1970. Courtesy High Museum of Art

West Coast photographer Wynn Bullock was a modernist whose work incorporated technical innovation and scientific discovery, influences that are as apparent in his work as his regard for raw nature. A retrospective on view at the High Museum of Art through January 18, 2015, provides an excellent overview of his work and serves as a mini-history of modernist photography, ranging from straight photography to experiments with light and color. Curated by the High’s Brett Abbott in collaboration with the Center for Creative Photography in Tucson, the show features 108 prints, 43 of which are part of a recent gift to the High of over 100 photos from the artist’s estate.

Bullock originally pursued a career as a singer and while spending time in Paris in the late 1920s, he first saw the work of avant-garde photographers Moholy-Nagy and Man Ray, which set him on his own path of photographic inquiry. His creative experimentation neatly dovetailed with his interest in science.

In attempts to express his ideas about such themes as man’s relationship to nature and the passing of time, Bullock often staged scenes that juxtaposed opposing qualities, as in the photograph of his young daughter lying naked beneath towering, centuries-old redwoods (Child in Forest, 1951), or the smooth skin of a woman, her back to the camera, a small, vulnerable presence amid the craggy and majestic trees (Nude Torso in Forest, 1958).

Wynn Bullock, Child in Forest, 1951. Courtesy High Museum of Art

Bullock achieved an effect that, for him, illustrated the time-space continuum by experimenting with longer exposures. In The Pilings (1958), for example, water flowing around the structural remnants become a blur, and the pilings, seen in such an ethereal setting, take on the appearance of ancient ruins. Similarly, Bullock masterfully captured the micro/macro dichotomy in Sea Palms (1968); what appears to be craggy mountaintops studded with swaying palm trees and enshrouded in fog is, in fact, algae growing on tidal rocks continuously lapped by water. 

Bullock is especially effective in evocative, abstract works. A group of photos of rocks and trees in which Bullock discerned human faces effectively alludes to our intertwinement with the natural world. Similarly, an untitled 1972 work shows a woman on a beach, partially embedded in the washed-over sand, her bent legs echoing the craggy rocks behind her. 

Possessing a photographer’s fascination with light, Bullock experimented with such techniques as solarization and photograms beginning in the late 1930s. For his Light Abstraction series of the ’30s and ’40s, he projected beams of light in his studio and photographed the patterns. In the ’60s, he shone light through thick glass and shot the refracted colors, creating, in essence, images of pure light. The colorful abstractions, anomalies in his oeuvre, resemble Hubble telescope images of the cosmos that would come decades later. They perhaps best achieve his stated desire, to “make what is invisible to the eye, visible.”  

 

— By Stephanie Cash  07/30/2014

Where There's Smoke. John Gossage: Who Do You Love

Fraenkel Gallery, San Francisco


Ruth Van Beek, The Arrangement, 2012. Courtesy Fraenkel Gallery

In its 30-plus years in operation, Fraenkel Gallery has honed its exhibition program to a state of canny perfection. Its roster brims with major photographers, and the presentations are smart and impeccably installed. It feels more daring, then, that its summer offering, a subtly engaging, thematically unified double feature, embraces themes of uncertainty. The two exhibitions on view through August 23 look at a new materiality, offhanded gestures, and emerging visions from the perspective of four contemporary photographers, and in little seen mixed-media works by John Gossage.

The group show, Where There’s Smoke, explores a sense of sculptural objectness through literal construction of images and choice of photographic subjects.  Collage pieces by Dutch artist Ruth Van Beek thematically address the notion of decorum. The grounds of these works are full-color pages from vintage homemaking magazines, most of still life images of minimalist flower arrangements. At least that’s what they appear to be; the artist has obscured the main forms with vibrant cutouts of watercolor painted paper, creating bulbous shapes that exude a perky mysteriousness. Cryptically elegant, they set up a dynamic between photographic image and object.

Viviane Sassen’s chromogenic prints also traffic in this tradition. She merges aspects of Robert Smithson’s Mirror Displacement works with Barbara Kasten’s Constructs, building a curious essence of site — a flattened perspective makes it notably difficult to pinpoint the location. Sassen creates geometric abstractions with mirrors and colored gels that she photographs in red desert sands in Africa. The simplicity of the camera tricks are not difficult to tease out, yet there’s a provocative tension, a daring vulnerability, of rickety construction playing out on a harsh backdrop. 

Viviane Sassen, Axiom GB01, 2014. Courtesy Fraenkel Gallery

There’s a similar sense of discordance to Michael Lundgren’s large photographs of unidentifiable objects — the strangest a dead fox with green fur in a shallow square grave — and sundry works from Jason Fulford’s appealingly noncommittal Hotel Oracle series. Where Lundgren favors elements that appear heavy and dark, presented as large prints, Fulford’s staggered arrangement of mismatched subjects — icicles on a staircase, a prosaic retail display of light bulbs — are more sanguine, and seemingly anachronistic, like lushly colored 1940s postcards. 

In his wall text, gallery director Darius Himes raises questions about how works were made and exploratory intentions. “Is the photographer off-kilter,” he asks, “or is the subject?” His selections suggest transition, the artists caught in the act of formation.

The 12 works by John Gossage are a couple of decades old and appear more settled in their skin. He mounted black-and-white photographs — atmospheric textures like footsteps on an expanse of sand, urban architecture, a bed of flowers — on larger sheets of paper accented with layers of smaller geometric applications of pastel colored paper. They have a sense of the poetic that brings to mind Richard Tuttle collages. Goassage’s works are most interesting for being a series that existed outside his straight photographic work. He too, productively tinkered with his foundation, and like these exhibitions, made gentle strides. 

 

— By Glen Helfand  07/29/2014

Allan Sekula: Ship of Fools

Christopher Grimes Gallery, Santa Monica


Allan Sekula, Churn, 1999-2010. Courtesy Christopher Grimes Gallery

In 1998, a cargo vessel called the Global Mariner set off from London, heading out on an 18-month journey around the world and back. The International Transport Workers Federation had bought the ship and installed an exhibition onboard detailing exploitations of seafaring workers’ rights. Images and videos told stories about how, for instance, an Indonesian radio officer drowned after jumping overboard to escape being beaten with an iron bar. 

Artist Allan Sekula, who died in 2013, had done work about conditions at sea before.  At the ITWF’s invitation, he traveled with the Global Mariner at various intervals, photographing its journey. He called the resulting series Ship of Fools, and first showed it at the Museum of Modern Art in Antwerp then at the Sao Paolo Biennial. When talking about this work, he discussed the history of maritime labor abuses, people’s growing oblivion to the physicality of capitalism, and the power of making art grounded in real experience.    

Allan Sekula, Ship Lesson (Durban), 1999-2010. Courtesy Christopher Grimes Gallery

On view through September 6 at Christopher Grimes Gallery, the photographs are striking and inarguably skillful. In one, a cadet in a gray jumpsuit smiles and leans toward the camera, the horizon line at a fantastic slant behind her head. The photograph of 15 uniformed school children from Durban, South Africa, is smartly balanced, and the staggeringly clear image of sun glimmering in the water in the ship’s wake is majestic. But had you not read up, none of these images would tell you that the Global Mariner is housing a protest exhibition or that Sekula was thinking about the sea as something deeply complicated. Excerpts from Lottery of the Sea, an essayistic 179-minute film he made about sea commerce in 2006 that play in a back room at the gallery do better at conveying the artist’s interests. 

If you knew Sekula in person or by reputation, knew he taught at California Institute of the Arts for nearly three decades, supported the students he believed in and cared sincerely about politics, you approach his art with a certain amount of goodwill. You want it to convey his concerns. But perhaps an exhibition of images on the wall is not the best way to experience his work. Perhaps in book form — a form Sekula often worked in -- with writing or interview transcripts alongside images, the complexities Ship of Fools grapples with could coexist with the gorgeousness of the photographs. 

 

— By Catherine Wagley  07/28/2014

Cantor Art Center Receives Warhol Archive


The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts has given the Cantor Art Center at Stanford University 3,600 contact sheets and negatives by Warhol that document the artist’s life and work. The archive of images includes Warhol’s day-to-day life as well as portraits of such celebrities as Truman Capote and John Lennon.  The work also sheds light on Warhol’s process, since the contact sheets are marked up to indicate images he wanted to keep and others he rejected. 

The Cantor Art Center and Stanford University’s Library will digitize the full archive, and in the spring of 2015, a new course on the Warhol archive will be taught by Professor Richard Meyer and Connie Wolf, director of the Cantor. An exhibition is planned for 2017, in conjunction with the 30th anniversary of the artist’s death.

 

— By Jean Dykstra  07/24/2014

Jack Leigh: Full Circle, Low Country Photographs, 1972-2004

SCAD Museum of Art, Savannah


Jack Leigh, Midnight, 1993. Courtesy SCAD Museum of Art

Savannah photographer Jack Leigh, who died ten years ago at the age of 55, is perhaps best known for his 1993 photograph Midnight, which depicts the famous Bird Girl sculpture in Savannah’s Bonaventure Cemetery. The photograph was commissioned by Random House for the cover of John Berendt’s immensely popular 1994 book Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil.

But Leigh was a prolific photographer whose black-and-white images are firmly rooted in the American documentary tradition. His passion was photographing the South’s fading traditions — the oystermen of coastal South Carolina, remote hamlets along the Ogeechee River, the dwindling shrimping industry. He spent years with the people he photographed, gaining their trust and sharing the pictures he made. 

Leigh attended the University of Georgia and later studied with George Tice, Eva Rubinstein, and Jill Freedman, whose photographs are also included in the exhibition, providing context and tracing the threads of influence. From the beginning of his career, his objective was to seek out and record the people, environments, and rapidly passing lifestyles of his native region.

Jack Leigh, Live Oak and Bench, 1989. Courtesy SCAD Museum of Art

Full Circle, Low Country Photographs, 1972-2004 is the first museum survey of work by Leigh since his death. The exhibition is on view through October 2 at the SCAD Museum of Art, which re-opened in 2011 after a major expansion, in a repurposed and beautifully reimagined antebellum train station.

Co-curated by Tim Peterson and Susan A. Laney, this mini retrospective covers three decades and includes images from a number of Leigh’s extended projects and books, including Oystering: A Way of Life; The Ogeechee: A River and Its People; Nets & Doors: Shrimping in Southern Waters; and Seaport: A Waterfront at Work. The beautifully printed images capture their subjects with depth and respect.

 

— By Bill Mindlin  07/24/2014

Josef Koudelka: Nationality Doubtful

Art Institute of Chicago, Chicago


Josef Koudelka, Romania, from the series Gypsies, 1968. ©Josef Koudelka/Magnum Photos, courtesy Pace/MacGill Gallery

Josef Koudelka’s art and life are comprised of journeys. This is the narrative of Nationality Doubtful, his retrospective on view at the Art Institute of Chicago through September 14 (after which it travels to the J. Paul Getty Museum in Los Angeles and Fundación MAPFRE in Madrid). The title derives from an annotation (“N.D.”) in Koudelka’s passport scribbled by border control, because he had been self-exiled from his native Czechoslovakia and was as nomadic as the Gypsies he famously documented. After chronicling the 1968 week-long Soviet occupation of Prague and its public protests and publishing images of the invasion in magazines in London and New York, Koudelka’s “perilous fame,” writes exhibition curator Matthew Witkovsky in the catalogue, impelled the photographer to wander Europe for years, often sleeping outdoors, photographing other displaced peoples and their divergent notions of home. A worn, hand-annotated map of European festival routes displayed in the gallery seems a tool as important to Koudelka as his Leica.

Josef Koudelka, Student on Tank, Eyes Cross Out, from the series Invasion, August 21/27, 1968. ©Josef Koudelka/Magnum Photos, courtesy Pace/MacGill Gallery

Artifacts and printed ephemera -- the map, but also workbooks and magazine spreads -- lend a personalized texture to the many black-and-white prints in this 54-year career survey. The intimate objects are a pleasure to see, but the real evidence of Koudelka’s lifelong, humanist campaign is the photography itself. Koudelka has contributed a wealth of information to the family album of humankind, granting special attention to people whose struggles are inseparable from their existence.

Koudelka did not claim authorship of his famous war photos until 15 years after they were published and circulated, under the protection of Magnum. During those years of exile, Koudelka produced his best work while traveling throughout Europe, including his many panoramic landscapes of empires in transition, from ancient Greece to the Israel-Palestine border. “But where are the people?” famously asked Cartier-Bresson, an admirer of Koudelka’s Gypsies series. The people are present by virtue of their ruins. In fact, Koudelka’s picturesque panoramas mark a shift from his close-ups of faces and funerals to a wider view, from the vantage point of history. The transition in scale, from the specific to the mythic, may be a consequence of maturity, but the pictures are still emotional, even sublime declarations of the persistence of human beings. 

— By Jason Foumberg  07/23/2014

Stephen Wirtz Gallery Closing


Installation view of Larry Sultan and Mike Mandel, We Make You Us, at Stephen Wirtz Gallery earlier this year

Stephen Wirtz has announced that he is closing his eponymous gallery in San Francisco after more than 35 years in business. The gallery has shown such photographers as Michael Kenna, Jim Goldberg, Lewis Baltz, Mark Steinmetz, Todd Hido, Larry Sultan, Mike Brodie, and Chris McCaw, among many others. 

The gallery will officially close in mid-August, but on Thursday August 7, from 6 to 8 pm, Stephen and Connie Wirtz invite those who would like to stop in and say farewell to join them at the gallery for drinks. 

— By Jean Dykstra  07/23/2014

archives

2014
December
November
October
September
Amon Carter Museum Digitizes Trove of Artworks


Climate Week NYC at ICP


Filter Photo Festival


Richard Mosse at Indianapolis Museum of Contemporary Art


Ernest Cole: Photographer

at Grey Art Gallery, New York


August Sander: Just Women / Jess T. Dugan: Every Breath We Drew

at Gallery Kayafas, Boston


August
Photo Shanghai Debuts


Kasher|Potamkin Launches New Gallery/Boutique


July
Wynn Bullock: Revelations

at High Museum of Art, Atlanta


Where There's Smoke. John Gossage: Who Do You Love

at Fraenkel Gallery, San Francisco


Allan Sekula: Ship of Fools

at Christopher Grimes Gallery, Santa Monica


Cantor Art Center Receives Warhol Archive


Jack Leigh: Full Circle, Low Country Photographs, 1972-2004

at SCAD Museum of Art, Savannah


Josef Koudelka: Nationality Doubtful

at Art Institute of Chicago, Chicago


Stephen Wirtz Gallery Closing


Justin Kimball: Where We Find Ourselves

at Carroll And Sons, Boston


Jacques Sonck: Archetypes

at L. Parker Stephenson Photographs, New York


The Invisible Photograph


Getty Acquires Robert McElroy Archive


Oresick Joins Silver Eye Center


Liz Deschenes Awarded Rappaport Prize


New Avedon App


Bonjour Arles!


Doug Hall: Bodies in Space

at Benrubi Gallery, New York


Cahiers d'Art Devoted to Sugimoto


Photo Espana Prize Goes to Aitor Lara


June
Anthony Friedkin: The Gay Essay

at de Young Museum, San Francisco


2014 Prix HSBC Awarded to Two Photographers


Rudolf Kicken, 1947-2014


"Biggest Photography Class in History"


Puppies and Pictures


Domesticated: Photographs by Amy Stein

at National Academy of Sciences, Washington


Steel Stillman: Incidents, 1969-2014

at Show Room Gowanus, Brooklyn


Callahan Collection Donated to Vancouver Art Gallery


Brandon Thibodeaux Wins Michael P. Smith Grant


Roger Mayne, 1929-2014


The Fence Goes on View in Brooklyn


Ka-Man Tse Wins Robert Giard Fellowship


Multiple Exposures: Jewelry and Photography / The Embroidered Image

at Museum of Arts and Design / Robert Mann Gallery, New York


Tim Barber: Relations

at Capricious 88, New York


May
Michael Flomen: Wild Nights

at Boite Noire Gallery, West Hollywood


Sze Tsung Leong: Horizons

at Yossi Milo Gallery, New York


Portland Art Museum Acquires Robert Adams Photographs


Michael Schmidt, 1945-2014


Paul Anthony Smith: Mangos and Crab

at Carrie Secrist Gallery, Chicago


Michael Schmidt Wins Prix Pictet


Jaimie Warren

at SF Camerawork, San Francisco


Symposium at Getty Celebrates 175th Anniversary of Photography


Zoe Leonard Receives Buckbaum Award


Andre Serrano Creates Public Art Project


Luigi Ghirri: La Città

at Matthew Marks Gallery (LA), Los Angeles


Richard Mosse Wins Deutsche Börse Prize


Poetics of Light: Pinhole Photography

at New Mexico History Museum, Santa Fe


Prix Pictet Finalists On View at V&A


Richard Renaldi: Touching Strangers / This Grand Show

at Aperture Gallery / Bonni Benrubi Gallery, New York


Hillman Photography Initiative Explores Future of Photography


Walking in Their Shoes


Mark Ruwedel Wins Scotiabank Photography Award


April
Gabor Kerekes, 1945-2014


Major Gifts to High Museum


Hiroshi Sugimoto Wins Isamu Noguchi Prize


Carolle Bénitah: Photos-Souvenirs

at Sous Les Etoiles Gallery, New York


A New Space for Photo-Eye


Maroesjka Lavigne: Island

at Robert Mann Gallery, New York


George Dureau, 1931-2014


More AIPAD Picks from Elisabeth Biondi


Elisabeth Biondi's AIPAD Picks


Sarah Schmerler's Picks from AIPAD


2014 Guggenheim Fellowships


Lisa Sette Relocating


Photo Eye: Avant-Garde Photography in Europe

at Museum of Fine Arts, Boston


Lower East Side Photo Walk


Roe Ethridge: Sacrifice Your Body

at Andrew Kreps Gallery, New York


March
Laurie Simmons: Kigurumi, Dollers and How We See

at Salon 94 Bowery, New York


Getty Museum Acquires Tress Photographs


Amy Elkins Wins Aperture Portfolio Prize


Moutoussamy-Ashe Photos Go to Smithsonian


Walead Beshty: Selected Bodies of Work

at Regen Projects, Los Angeles


Public Intimacy: Art and Other Ordinary Acts in South Africa

at Yerba Buena Center for the Arts, San Francisco


Prince/Cariou Case Settled


Daniel Gordon Wins Paul Huf Award


New Photo Gallery in Williamsburg


ICP on the Move


National Gallery of Art Receives Gift of Photographs


Jamie Warren Wins Baum Award


Chloe Dewe Mathews Wins Gardner Fellowship


Matthew Pillsbury: Nate and Me

at Sasha Wolf Gallery, New York


Getty Images Opens Up Library


Paula McCartney: A Field Guide to Snow and Ice

at Klompching Gallery, Brooklyn


American Cool

at National Portrait Gallery, Washington, D.C.


February
Steichen/Warhol: Picturing Fame

at Block Museum of Art, Evanston


ICP Announces Infinity Award Winners


Onward in Philly


Samuel Fosso Photographs Rescued


J. Shimon & J. Lindemann: We Go From Where We Know

at John Michael Kohler Art Center, Sheboygan


John Stanmeyer Wins World Press Photo Award


Not Your Grandmother's Librarian


Patrick Nagatani: Outer and Inner: Contemplations on the Physical and the Spiritual

at Andrew Smith Gallery (annex), Santa Fe


New Photo Gallery in Boston


Fred McDarrah: Save the Village

at Steven Kasher Gallery, New York


J.D. 'Okhai Ojeikere, 1930-2014


Kevin Cooley and Phillip Andrew Lewis: Unexplored Territory

at Kopeikin Gallery, Los Angeles


January
Public Art Project Highlights the Boroughs


Carrie Mae Weems: Three Decades of Photography and Video

at Guggenheim Museum, New York


Getty Acquires Pictorialist Photographs


Peter Hujar: Love & Lust

at Fraenkel Gallery, San Francisco


Child Identified in 1908 Lewis Hine Photo


Heather Snider Joins SF Camerawork


The Sochi Project: An Atlas of War and Tourism in the Caucasus

at DePaul Art Museum, Chicago


Phillip Prodger Joins London's National Portrait Gallery


Tanya Marcuse: Fallen

at Julie Saul Gallery, New York


Joshua Chuang Joins CCP


Sophie Calle: Last Seen

at Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum, Boston


Danielle Durchslag: Relative Unknowns

at Denny Gallery, New York


Carnegie Museum Founds Hillman Photography Initiative


Soo Kim Awarded Gutmann Fellowship


Symposium on March on Washington


2013
December
November
Balthus: The Last Studies

at Gagosian Gallery (Mad Ave), New York


Saul Leiter, 1923-2013


Maine Philanthropists Give Collection to Portland Museum of Art


Daniel Morel Wins Suit Against Getty Images/AFP


Sean McFarland: Glass Mountains

at Stephen Wirtz Gallery, San Francisco


John Divola: As Far As I Could get

at Santa Barbara Museum of Art, LACMA, Pomona Museum of Art,


Eileen Quinlan: Curtains

at Miguel Abreu Gallery, New York


ICP Names New Executive Director


Clarence John Laughlin Award Announced


Prix Pictet Shortlist Announced


And the Winner Is ....


Libération's Powerful Homage to Photography


Tanja Hollander: The Landscapes of Are You Really My Friend?

at Carroll And Sons, Boston


War/Photography: Images of Armed Conflict and its Aftermath

at Brooklyn Museum of Art, Brooklyn


Lisa Hostetler to Eastman House


Dispatched to Texas


Finding Vivian Maier


Queens Museum Reopens with Photos by Jeff Chien-Hsing Liao


New E-Book from Library of Congress


Hello, Goodbye


October
Iké Udé: Style and Sympathies

at Leila Heller Gallery, New York


Deborah Turbeville, 1932-2013


ICP Celebrates Robert Capa's Centenary


Of Walking

at Museum of Contemporary Photography, Chicago


Here is New York


Polly Borland: You

at PK Shop, New York


Exhibition Showcases Martin Weinstein's Collection


They Are Us: Animal Identity and the Anthropomorphic Urge

at Rick Wester Fine Art, New York


Roxana Marcoci Named Senior Curator at MoMA


Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, Acquires Manfred Heiting Photo Book Collection


Documerica Looks Back


Matthew Porter: Greet the Dust

at M+B Gallery, Los Angeles


George Tice: 60 Years of Photography

at Nailya Alexander Gallery, New York


September
Sebastiaan Bremer

at Edwynn Houk Gallery, New York


Carrie Mae Weems Is a MacArthur Genius


We Shall: Photographs by Paul D'Amato

at DePaul Art Museum, Chicago


She Who Tells a Story: Women Photographers from Iran and the Arab World

at Museum of Fine Arts, Boston


Malcolm Daniel Heading to Texas


Ryan McGinley: Yearbook

at Ratio 3, San Francisco


Brian Sholis Joins Cincinnati Art Museum


Pieter Hugo: Kin

at Yossi Milo Gallery, New York


Adieu to Le Journal de la Photographie


Nadia Sablin Wins Firecracker Photography Award


Getty Acquires Baltz Archive


August
Ray Metzker: Shadow Catcher

at Andrew Smith Gallery, Santa Fe


Guillermo Santos: La Ciudad Blanca

at Fotografica Bogota 2013,


The Getty Shares Its Collections


Inez & Vinoodh

at Gagosian Gallery (LA), Beverly Hills


July
Christian Houge: Shadow Within

at Hosfelt Gallery, San Francisco


Party Picks: Estate of Jimmy DeSana

at Salon 94 Bowery, New York


In The Studio

at John Messinger, East Hampton


That Which Is: Marcia Lippman

at KMR Arts, Washington Depot


Ben Lifson, 1941-2013


Jan Banning: Down and Out in the South

at Hagedorn Foundation Gallery, Atlanta


Tom Wood: Men and Women

at Thomas Erben Gallery, New York


From the Ground Up: The Tent Camera Photographs of Abelardo Morell

at Stephen Daiter Gallery, Chicago


Portion Control: Chrisopher Boffoli

at Winston Wachter Fine Art, New York


June
Bing Wright: Broken Mirror/Evening Sky

at James Harris Gallery, Seattle


A Different Kind of Order: The International Center of Photography Triennial

at International Center of Photography, New York


JR / Jose Parla, Wrinkles of the City, Havana Cuba

at Bryce Wolkowitz Gallery, New York


May
David Hilliard: The Tale is True

at Carroll And Sons, Boston


Japan's Modern Divide: Photographs by Hiroshi Hamaya and Kansuke Yamamoto

at Getty Center, Los Angeles


Michael Jang: The Jangs

at Stephen Wirtz Gallery, San Francisco


David Levinthal: War Games

at Corcoran Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C.


Mike Brodie's Period of Juvenile Prosperity


Spectator Sports

at Museum of Contemporary Photography, Chicago


Joshua Lutz: Hesitating Beauty

at ClampArt, New York


April
Shiprock and Mont St. Michel: Photographs by William Clift

at New Mexico Museum of Art, Santa Fe


Garry Winogrand

at SFMOMA, San Francisco


Liliana Porter: 1973

at Barbara Krakow Gallery, Boston


In The Studio

at Dillon DeWaters, Brooklyn


AIPAD's Photography Show


Bruce Davidson


March
Bill Brandt: Shadow and Light

at Museum of Modern Art, New York


Iwan Baan: The Way We Live

at Perry Rubenstein Gallery, Los Angeles


Suburbia

at Hagedorn Foundation Gallery, Atlanta


Julie Weitz

at The Suburban, Oak Park


Armory Show 2013

at Armory Show, New York


Scope New York 2013

at SCOPE New York, New York


ADAA Art Show 2013

at ADAA Art Show, New York


Shooting Stars: Publicity Stills from Early Hollywood and Portraits by Andy Warhol

at Corcoran Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C.


February
Topsy Turvy in Madison Square Park


JoAnn Verburg: Present Tense

at G. Gibson Gallery, Seattle


Miles Barth Joins Artnet


The Unphotographable

at Fraenkel Gallery, San Francisco


Katrina del Mar: Girls Girls Girls

at Participant, Inc., New York


Robin Rhode: Take Your Mind off the Street

at Lehmann Maupin (26th St), New York


Arne Svenson: The Neighbors

at Western Project, Culver City


January
Silvio Wolf: Us

at Bruce Silverstein Gallery, New York


Beat Memories: The Photographs of Allen Ginsberg

at Grey Art Gallery, New York


Katherine Bussard Named Curator at
Princeton Art Museum


Catherine Wagner: trans/literate.

at Stephen Wirtz Gallery, San Francisco


Karl Baden: Roadside Attractions

at Miller Yezerski Gallery, Boston


Viviane Sassen on View


January is for Hot Shots


Richard Pare: The Lost Vanguard: Soviet Modernist Architecture, 1922–32

at Graham Foundation, Chicago


2012
December
Faking it: Manipulated Photography Before Photoshop

at Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York


Idris Khan: New Photographs

at Fraenkel Gallery, San Francisco


Jessica Eaton: Polytopes

at M+B Gallery, Los Angeles


Nadav Kander: Yangtze: The Long River

at Flowers, New York


Ori Gersht: History Repeating

at Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, Boston


Attachments

at The Hole, New York


1979:1—2012:21: Jan Tichy Works with the MoCP Collection

at Museum of Contemporary Photography, Chicago


Bonni Benrubi, 1953-2012


November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January
2011
December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January
2010
December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January
2009
December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January
2008
December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January
2007
December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January
2006
December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January
2005
December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January
2004
December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January