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Man Ray: Human Equations: A Journey from Mathematics to Shakespeare

Phillips Collection, Washington


Man Ray, Mathematical Object, 1934-35. ©Man Ray Trust / Artist Rights Society (ARS), New York, ADAGP Paris

In Man Ray's own introduction to the series of paintings he named “The Shakespearean Equations,” he had the good and the bad sense to quote a friendly critic of his art: Andre Breton had warned Man Ray that by showing his pieces next to the mathematical objects that had inspired them, the art would risk seeing “its realization definitely outclassed.” Breton was right. You can't beat mathematics for stark beauty. 

The most fascinating, uncanny objects in the exhibition Man Ray – Human Equations: A Journey From Mathematics to Shakespeare, at the Phillips Collection through May 10, are not the ones made by the artist but rather the mathematical objects that they're based on, models made out of white plaster, papier-mache, wood, thread, string, and metal, from the Institut Henri Poincaré in Paris. These models, made around 1900, are simply beautiful and, if you're not a mathematician, simply incomprehensible. 

Here's the back-story: In the 1930s, Max Ernst encouraged Man Ray, a fellow Surrealist, to visit these models of mathematical equations at the Institut Poincaré. One of the models, a 3-D illustration of a “Kummer Surface with Eight Real Double Points,” for instance, is an arrangement of Jean-Arp-like shapes – conical objects with some flat facets and some curvaceous bites taken out of them. At first, Man Ray merely photographed the models, using dramatic lighting to bring out their angles, shadows, and grooves. 

Man Ray, Shakespeare Equation, Twelfth Night, 1948. ©Man Ray Trust / Artist Rights Society (ARS), New York, ADAGP Paris

But Man Ray went one step, sometimes two, too far. In the late 1940s, long after he'd left occupied France and moved to the United States, he revisited the photographs he'd taken in the 1930s and made paintings based on them – the “Human Equations.” And once he had finished the paintings, he gave some of them Shakespearean titles; these were his “Shakespearean Equations.” For instance, his painting based on the “Kummer Surface” model seems to show a tawny, flat-headed figure running with his arms thrown out; this becomes “King Lear.” For another painting based on a mathematical model, which resembles a man's starched shirt front with holes gouged out, he adds in the figure of an upside-down chair leg with a guilty-looking caster as a head; this becomes “Julius Caesar.” As Breton all but predicted, the comparison of gorgeous, uncanny mathematical models with Surrealist painting does Surrealist painting no favor at all. 

 

— By Sarah Boxer  02/27/2015

ICP Announces Infitity Awards


Graciela Iturbide

The International Center of Photography has announced the recipients of its annual Infinity Awards: Graciela Iturbide will be recognized with the Cornell Capa Lifetime Achievement Award;  the Art award goes to Larry Fink; and the award for Photojournalism goes to Tomas van Houtrvye. The award for best publication goes to LaToya Ruby Frazier’s The Notion of Family; the Young Photographer Award goes to Evgenia Arbugaeva, and the Trustee Award goes to The Lean-In Collection, by Getty Images and Leanin.org, a library of more than 4,500 creative images devoted to the powerful depiction of women, girls, families and the workplace.

A special award is being presented to fashion photographer Mario Testino.

For the first time this year, the ICP is presenting an award for New Media, which goes to Question Bridge: Black Males, an interactive work by Hank Willis Thomas, Chris Johnson, Bayette Ross Smith, Kamal Sinclair, and Jesse Williams. The awards will be presented at the ICP gala in New York City on April 30.

 

— By Jean Dykstra  02/27/2015

Hal Fischer: Gay Semiotics

Cherry and Martin, Los Angeles


Hal Fischer, from Gay Semiotics, 1977/2014. Courtesy Cherry and Martin Gallery

When Hal Fischer published his wry, straightforward Gay Semiotics photographs in 1977, he wrote an essay to accompany them. “Traditionally western societies have utilized signifiers for non-accessibility,” he explained, citing wedding and engagement rings. “Signs for availability simply do not exist.” But in gay culture, the reverse is true, he went on to say; such signs not only exist but are varied and nuanced.

His photographs, which he referred to as “research,” lay out such signs. In one image, two men in jeans, seen from behind, stand next to each other. Each has a handkerchief in his back pocket. Given that the image is black and white, you can’t tell red from blue, except that the text superimposed onto the image tells you which color is which. A blue handkerchief “signifies that the wearer will assume the active or traditional male role during sexual intercourse.” A red one signifies “behavior often regarded as deviant.” Of course, there’s also the possibility that a red handkerchief, or a blue one, could be used for “treatment of nasal discharge” and have no sexual significance at all. 

Hal Fischer, from Gay Semiotics, 1977/2014. Courtesy Cherry and Martin Gallery

The handkerchief image and the rest of Fischer’s series are on view at Cherry and Martin Gallery through February 21, and it’s the first time the whole series has been seen together since 1977. A vitrine to the right of the door includes Fischer’s Gay Semiotics book and other ephemera related to the photographs he took in San Francisco, particularly the Castro District. On the wall, the photos hang in staggered groups, usually by category (Fischer had divided his images into groups: Signifiers, Archetypal Media Images, Fetishes, Street Fashions). Three Archetypal photos depicting leather and S & M stereotypes, hang in a line beside a cluster of three Fetish photos, including one of a man in a gag mask.

It’s funny how quickly these photographs, exhibited now, read as stylish and attractive. Think of Sarah Conaway’s recent pseudo-vintage black and white images of shoes tied up, or Ann Collier’s 2011 photograph of a 1972 appointment calendar laid out clinically against a white background: the minimal aesthetic of 1970s conceptual photography is itself a fetish, its deadpan directness signifying a certain kind of savvy. 

But 40 years ago, Fischer was already poking fun at the apparent savvy of the minimal, descriptive imagery he was employing, and the deceptively deadpan texts are perhaps the best part of his project. Even with a guide to “signifiers” as clear as his, determining what other people want from each other remains impossibly mysterious. In reference to an image of a man with a mustache and stud in his left ear, Fischer wrote, the “stud is often adopted by non-homosexual men, thus making the earring the most subtle of homosexual signifiers. “

 

— By Catherine Wagley  02/17/2015

Simone Lueck: American Movie

Kopeikin Gallery, Los Angeles


Simone Lueck, Cree at Dairy Queen, 2014. Courtesy Kopeikin Gallery

When I was growing up, my mother used to tell a story about a beautiful navy pea coat that she wanted after seeing it in a catalog. She begged her own mother, who felt the coat would not be warm enough for Wisconsin winters. Finally, my mother won out.  But when the coat came, it didn’t look the way it had in the pictures. It wasn’t warm enough, and in the cold, the fabric got hard, so wearing it was like walking around in cardboard. The lesson seemed to be: sometimes dreams don’t match reality, and there’s nothing you can do. 

Simone Lueck’s exhibition at Kopeikin Gallery through February 26, American Movie, conjures that sort of story. It features people Lueck found through casting calls she held in different cities, asking people to pose as either specific icons or generic ones. In Berlin, she asked people to play Marlene Dietrich; in Atlanta, she asked for Scarlett O’Hara; in New York, she asked for buxom brunettes and blonde bombshells. 

Simone Lueck, Casting Call for Cleopatra, 2014. Courtesy Kopeikin Gallery

Her unforgiving lighting seems better suited to a reality show, though, and the first thing you notice is how not-quite-right each figure is. Matthew, who responded to the Scarlett O’Hara call, wears a black wig and faux pearls over a vintage black dress with puffed sleeves and shoulders that drown his arms. He’s posed in harsh sunlight, and his wide, dramatic eyes pull at the heartstrings. But he seems all wrong, wearing that dress in that place. 

Other photographers have used open calls for their work. When L.A.-based photographer Charlie White held a casting call for the ideal California teenage girl, it was unnerving how well the teens who responded fit themselves into the ideal of blond, sunny prettiness. Katy Grannan found subjects through classified ads and photographed them in intense California sun that threw their unconventionality into focus. The resulting images did not always seem kind, but Grannan allowed her subjects to be who they were. 

Lueck’s images, on the other hand, emphasize what her actors are not. In an image of Cee, another Scarlett wannabe, sitting at a Dairy Queen, her big yellow hat makes it seem like she’s wandered away from a costume party. The show is effective in that way: it forces you to think about the gap between ideal and real. But it’s hard not to wish the gap were less glaring, because then maybe the images would feel more sensitive to each individual actor’s aspirations.    

 

— By Catherine Wagley  02/13/2015

Brian Wallis Leaving ICP


Brian Wallis, deputy director of exhibitions and collections and chief curator at the International Center of Photography is leaving he organization at the end of the month. 

Wallis joined ICP in 1999 and during his tenure, the museum has presented more than 150 exhibitions and acquired more than 20,000 photographs. His curatorial program has focused on contemporary photography while examining the history of photojournalism and documentary photography. 

The many exhibitions Wallis curated at the ICP include Larry Clark (2005), America and the Tintype (2009), and Weegee: Murder is My Business (2012). He also co-curated Strangers: The First ICP Triennial of Photography and Video and was involved in the 2007 recovery of the Mexican Suitcase, a long-lost cache of 4,300 negatives made during the Spanish Civil War by Robert Capa, Gerda Taro, and Chim.

Wallis will work as a curator for the Walther Collection, where he is organizing The Order of Things: Photography from the Walther Collection, which will open at the Walther Collectin in Neu-Ulm/Burlafingen, Germany, in May.

 

— By Jean Dykstra  02/13/2015

Esko Männikkö: Time Flies

Yancey Richardson, New York


Esko Männikkö, Untitled, from the series Organized Freedom, 2013. Courtesy Yancey Richardson Gallery

To say that Esko Männikkö’s photographs are about dilapidation and ruin is true, but also a bit misleading. It suggests a certain bleakness, when in fact Männikkö's subjects are dilapidated in a riotous, effusive way. The mold on the hood of an abandoned car is an efflorescence of mossy blooms; the green peeling paint on a wall behind a tattered red chair is flaking off almost organically, like the room itself is shedding its skin. Time Flies, at Yancey Richardson Gallery through March 14, is less about decay than it is about nature’s ability to reclaim manmade things, to wrap them in its fertile embrace. 

Things peel, tear, sink, erode, and rust in spectacular fashion and rich color in Männikkö's photographs, which nevertheless maintain an almost studied formal symmetry. He frames his subjects, whether a close up of a weathered face carved in marble or a view of a collapsed room, with clear intent. The bowed remnant of a bit of blue drywall in one image of a caved-in room, ceiling sagging and beams askew, or the graffiti version of Vermeer’s Girl with a Pearl Earring on a derelict brick wall, offer glimpses of beauty among the ruins. 

Esko Männikkö, Sylvi?, 2001. Courtesy Yancey Richardson Gallery

Männikkö's use of light and color is not unlike that found in Vermeer and his peers. As he has in previous exhibitions, Männikkö mounts his photographs in rough-hewn hand-made wooden frames, which adds to their formality and to their painterly aspects and works against the traditions of social documentary photography. Although his photographs are rooted in the materiality of his subjects, they have plenty of metaphoric potential as well. Several works on view are from his series Blues Brothers, photographs of memorial statuary in which the faces of the deceased are partially eroded or disfigured by oxidation or weathering. It’s hard not to read into those images a message about the vanity of leaving a lasting mark and the folly of thinking anything lasts. 

— By Jean Dykstra  02/06/2015

New Director for Paris Photo


Florence Bourgeois, formerly managing director of Pavilion of Art and Design, Paris and London, has been named the new director of Paris Photo and Paris Photo LA, scheduled for May 1 to 3. Christoph Wiesner, formerly senior director of Yvon Lambert, will be the artistic director. Julien Frydman, previously director of Paris Photo, had announced in December that he was leaving the post.

— By Jean Dykstra  02/06/2015

Visibility Machines: Harun Farocki and Trevor Paglen

Gallery 400, Chicago


Trevor Paglen, LACROSSE/ONYX V, near Cepheus (Synthetic Aperture Radar Reconnaissance Satellite, USA 182), 2008. Courtesy Galley 400

One of the first live-camera broadcasts from a missile was deployed (in tests only) by the Germans in 1942. Thus began the era of remote-control warfare, and the proliferation of a TV-based society. This factoid comes via Harun Farocki’s 2003 film War at a Distance, which re-packages several decades’ worth of bombing didactics in a video documentary about the evolution of imaging technology as a byproduct of the military industry. Three of Farocki’s critical films are paired with the drone surveillance photographs of Trevor Paglen in Visibility Machines at Gallery 400 (through March 14), a touring exhibition curated by Niels Van Tomme.

An air of espionage permeates the dimly lit exhibition, as if the whole thing were plucked from a government file. Closer to the truth is that both Farocki and Paglen relied on insiders and veterans to help them obtain their sources, such as the paths of orbiting drones (Paglen) or therapeutic video-games for post-traumatic soldiers (Farocki). Farocki and Paglen’s reverse-surveillance art seems a natural fit, although the artists did not meet until this exhibition was first convened in 2013 (before Farocki died, leaving behind a prolific film oeuvre).

Harun Farocki, Serious Games 4, A sun with no shadow, 2010. Courtesy Gallery 400

Paglen’s long-exposure The Other Night Sky series (2008–2013), of drone lights smeared across the night sky, can easily be mistaken for astral photography. His other images include sun-drenched pixels and highly zoomed views of military landscapes by moonlight—they are either bases or targets; the images are not very clear, but several are formally beautiful, perhaps incidentally. 

If robots can kill, can they be artists, too? Not under the rubric that art be self-aware and critical. Instead, a well-designed, even creative, bombsite video plotted by computerized robots—what Farocki calls “operational images”—presented out of context (in an art gallery) compels a different sort of utility than that used by the military, for tactical images can be powerful in the hands of artists who flip them into grassroots propaganda, or art-activism.

The greatest service such images can perform for viewers is exposure to the virtual interface of combat. Although drones always seem to lurk in the background, an occasional encounter with the military sublime—that camouflaged wall of power—can drive civilian outrage and action.

 

— By Jason Foumberg  02/01/2015

Drew Sawyer at Columbus Museum of Art


Drew Sawyer

Drew Sawyer has been named associate curator of photography at the Columbus Museum of Art. The Beaumont and Nancy Newhall Curatorial Fellow at the Museum of Modern Art, Sawyer is a PhD candidate at Columbia University. Sawyer has held curatorial positions at the Guggenheim and the Chazen Museum of Art. He’s working on upcoming exhibitions with Zoe Leonard and LaToya Ruby Frazier. 

In addition David Stark has been named chief curator of the museum, and Ann Dumas has been named adjunct curator of European art.

 

— By Jean Dykstra  01/31/2015

Mark Klett: Camino del Diablo

Pace/MacGill Gallery, New York


Mark Klett, Abandoned Windmill, Bates Well, Cabeza Prieta, 2013. Courtesy Pace/MacGill Gallery

In 1870, a young mining engineer, Raphael Pumpelly, wrote Across America and Asia: Notes of a Five Years’ Journey Around the World, which included an account of his travels through Arizona’s Camino Del Diablo, or “The Road of the Devil.” 

Nearly 150 years later, Mark Klett has approximated Pumpelly’s path, using the historical text as a rough guide for his own exploration of the landscape. In Camino del Diablo, on view at Pace/MacGill Gallery through February 21, past and present intersect, overlap and divert course, making for a fascinating study of time and its relationship with place. 

Like many early adventurers in strange “new” lands, Pumpelly regarded the Camino – an unforgiving desert where conflict between white settlers, Mexican laborers, and Native Americans was common – with a mix of dread, excitement, and naiveté. In Klett’s photographs, which are presented alongside facsimiles of the book, he steps into Pumpelly’s shoes without getting too comfortable in them. He captures the spirit of the explorer’s dark, wide-eyed vision with a critical distance.

In his most literal interpretations of Pumpelly’s words, Klett captures some of the natural elements of the desert, including a rattlesnake, which Pumpelly called the desert’s “most powerful inhabitant,” and the saguaro cactus, whose “fluted” architecture Pumpelly compared to a Grecian column. In these images, the Camino seems ageless and changeless.

Mark Klett, Sign Explaining the History of the Camino del Diablo, with bullet holes, 2013. Courtesy Pace MacGill Gallery

But Klett’s work is perhaps most intriguing when it shows how the Camino of today – it now encompasses a U.S. military training ground and sees the movements of smugglers and illegal immigrants – mirrors its past. In photos of tire tracks and a blanket left by a passing immigrant, one sees parallels to Pumpelly’s record of inspecting “the sand for tracks, and every object within fifty yards for the lurking place of an Indian.” In a photo of an unexploded ordinance, one is reminded that violence still reigns in the desert.    

But beauty, Klett insists, is just as pervasive as danger in the Camino, a notion he proves again and again. The dichotomy presents itself most clearly in a close-up of a sign explaining the place’s history. The sign is riddled with bullet holes, but one can see through them small glimpses of the stark, lovely mountains and sky beyond, a poignant indication that the desert, in all its contradictions, is an intriguing muse.

 

— By Jordan G. Teicher  01/31/2015

The Return to Reason

Gallery Wendi Norris, San Francisco


Stephen Gill, Talking to Ants, 2009-12. Courtesy Gallery Wendi Norris

At first glance, the works in Return to Reason, on view at Gallery Wendi Norris through February 28, compose yet another exhibition of conceptual, process-based photography. It features five artists who fabricate ephemeral objects to be photographed, generate low-tech visual effects in and out of the darkroom, and display their works in installation format. Such tactics pop up frequently in surveys of new photography, perhaps because they counteract the offhandedness of Instagram. This show, organized with Allie Haeusslein, associate director of Pier 24 , mines this increasingly familiar field, but with a particular thematic thread: the use of alternative processes to depict specific sites. 

Titled after a 1923 experimental film by Man Ray, the show emphasizes process, yet each of the artists’ works evokes distant locations, both actual and constructed. This motif is most emphatically explored by the tropically hued panache of Lorenzo Vitturi’s mixed-media works, inspired by an East London market that caters to immigrants, with brightly colored Afro Caribbean produce and medicinal powders. He throws in varied strategies-- constructing edible arrangements for the camera, playing boldly with scale, displaying works on stacks of bricks, and placing vinyl texts and patterns on walls and floor. Despite some undercurrents of exoticization, it’s an insistent, ebullient presentation.

Hannah Whitaker, Difference Engine no. 1, 2014. Courtesy Gallery Wendi Norris

A calmer, dreamier vibe is evoked by the largest of Chloe Sells’s unique analogue C-prints. Katoyissiksi, 2014, is a vertical strip of photo paper with a doubled image of a tall pine in the Rocky Mountains augmented with ghostly photograms and rainbow-producing darkroom effects. Sells’s work resonates with a large piece by Hannah Whitaker, Difference Engine No. 1, 2014, an image of blue sky photographed with an angular paper cut out placed before the lens, so the images resembles a surrealist backgammon board.  Yamini Nayar’s photographed constructions engage with architecture and sculptural practices, yet thematically the works seem a little stranded here.  

Stephen Gill's assured square-format London streetscapes appear to be mixed-media works, but they are, in fact, single exposures, what the artist describes as “in-camera photograms.” Into the picture, Gill adds bits of refuse, toys, threads, broken glass, dust, rubber bands, objects that have been collected at the site and placed inside an apparatus attached to the front of his camera. The resulting images combine straight photography, the graphic quality of a photogram, and conceptually nuanced imagery of place.  Like most of the works here, the sense of place is otherworldly, meandering wonderfully beyond reason. 

— By Glen Helfand  01/30/2015

Gordon Parks: Segregation Story, High Museum of Art and Jackson Fine Art; Gordon Parks: American Champion, Arnika Dawkins Gallery

High Museum of Art, Atlanta


Gordon Parks, Department Store, Mobile, Alabama, 1956. ©The Gordon Parks Foundation. Courtesy High Museum of Art

Gordon Parks, who died in 2006, is having an Atlanta moment. Three shows of the artist’s works are concurrently on view – two that feature a groundbreaking series of images that Parks took while on assignment for Life magazine in 1956, and a third that focuses on photos of a young Muhammad Ali. 

In 1956, Parks traveled to Shady Grove, Alabama, to document the lives of African-Americans living under the oppressive Jim Crow laws, specifically three generations of the Thornton family. Twenty-six of those images were published in Life that year; the rest were believed to have been lost until over 200 transparencies were discovered in the artist’s archives in 2012. A selection of 40 photos from the series is on view at the High Museum of Art in Segregation Story through June 7, and 28 of those are also at Jackson Fine Art through March 14. 

The images are exceptional. Color film was not in wide use at the time, and Parks set out to show the humanity of his subjects rather than the headline-grabbing conflicts of the Civil Rights Movement that were the norm. In a 2012 piece on the New York Times blog Lens, art historian and critic Maurice Berger aptly described them as “radically prosaic.” The actual magazine spreads are displayed in a vitrine at the High (and in the catalogue), allowing for a comparison of Parks’s original compositions and the cropped versions that ran in the publication.

Gordon Parks, Untitled, Alabama, 1956. ©The Gordon Parks Foundation. Courtesy High Museum of Art

Parks was harassed and threatened during his week in Alabama, and the persecution of the family members who participated continued long after. The Thorntons’s daughter Allie Lee Causey, in particular, was targeted for her outspoken comments. She was fired from her teaching job and her husband ostracized; they and their children ultimately moved out of the state with $25,000 relocation assistance from Life

A number of Parks’s already iconic images from the series are included – six children peering through the fence of an off-limits whites-only playground; a father getting ice cream for his kids from a fountain shop’s side window for “coloreds.” Two notable images from the cache found in 2012 are that of a woman and her niece standing under a “Colored Entrance” sign outside a movie theater and a photo of three kids standing side by side behind a barbed wire fence, two black boys brandishing very realistic toy guns and a white boy smiling at the camera. Another photo, of a stoic black nanny holding a white woman’s infant in a waiting area at the Atlanta airport, has resonated with viewers so much that New York Times Lens blog recently launched a public search to find out the identities of the two women.

The show at Arnika Dawkins Gallery (through March 27) centers on photos of a young Muhammad Ali – training, fighting, resting, traveling. We see him driving a convertible Cadillac in Miami, for instance, and greeting fans from his London hotel window. In two portraits, Ali wears his sweatshirt hood pulled over his head, as if post-workout. It’s a sight that, today, speaks not to hard work and excellence but to racial profiling and police brutality – a kind of segregation that persists, and not only in the South. 

 

— By Stephanie Cash  01/27/2015

Edmund Teske

Gitterman Gallery, New York


Edmund Teske, Kenneth Anger, Topanga Canyon, 1954. ©Estate of Edmund Teske, courtesy Gitterman Gallery

Edmund Teske’s photographs seem to exist outside of any standard chronology. They include otherworldly, almost Victorian studies as well as portraits of such public figures as The Doors’ Jim Morrison.  Perhaps because his work is so hard to pin down, Teske, who died in 1996, has floated largely under the radar. Despite museum shows, including Spirit into Matter organized at the Getty in 2004, his work has not found the same traction as that of, say, Robert Heinecken, friend and fellow photographic manipulator. So the elegant exhibition at Gitterman Gallery through January 24 is a rare opportunity to see Teske’s unique, painterly photographs, some never before exhibited.

Teske was born in Chicago but made his way to Hollywood and settled in with a fertile, creative group of friends, including the underground filmmaker Kenneth Anger, the subject of one toned, solarized, almost mythical image in the show, and the curator and museum director Walter Hopps, who appears in several others. Teske used collage, solarization, and toning to achieve a variety of affects – a landscape seeps into a portrait, time periods are compressed, leaves and trees engulf his human subjects, and streaks of umber stain the prints. It was Edward Steichen who labeled Teske’s process “duotone solarization.” In one untitled image from the 1970s, a pattern of steel grey and rust fans out across a nude male torso. A necessarily veiled homoeroticism runs throughout some of the prints, as well as a spiritual exploration centered on Hindu philosophy, which absorbed Teske after his move to California in the 1940s. 

Edmund Teske, Mono Lake, California, 1971. ©Estate of Edmund Teske, courtesy Gitterman Gallery

Teske’s allegorical works can seem old-fashioned, but his lush, duotoned Mono Lake, 1971, could be a precursor to Matthew Brandt’s 2012 image of the same setting in his series Lakes and Resevoirs. Teske's aesthetic approach mirrored his philosophical ruminations: by combining and reusing images, he imagined time as a fluid, malleable entity. His photographs are the antithesis of the decisive moment; rather, they seem to fall through time, in a sort of dream state.

— By Jean Dykstra  01/20/2015

Classic Photographs Los Angeles


Josef Koudelka, Zehra, 1967. Courtesy Robert Koch Gallery

Los Angeles is the place to be this coming weekend, when close to 30 dealers of vintage, modern, and contemporary photographs gather at Bonham’s for the Classic Photographs LA fair. The fair, which runs January 17 and 18, includes tours led by Robert Flynn Johnsons, curator emeritus of the Achenbach Foundation for Graphic Arts at the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco, and April M. Watson, curator of photography at the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art. In addition, photograph conservator Gawain Weaver will be available to consult with attendees at the fair about the condition of their photographs.

— By Jean Dykstra  01/12/2015

Library of Congress Acquires Camilo José Vergara Archive


Camilo José Vergara, Former Hollingshead Chemical, 16th at Admiral Wilson Blvd., Camden,  2004. Courtesy Library of Congress

The Library of Congress has acquired the archives of photographer Camilo José Vergara, who has documented post-industrial cities in the United States for the last 40 years. Vergara has photographed such cities as Detroit, New York, Los Angeles, and Camden, showing how these areas have fallen into ruin and also how some areas have been revitalized. Born in Chile, Vergara earned a BA from the University of Notre Dame and a masters degree in sociology from Columbia University. He is the author several books including, most recently, Tracking Time – Documenting America’s Post-Industrial Cities

 

— By Jean Dykstra  01/12/2015

archives

2015
December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
Man Ray: Human Equations: A Journey from Mathematics to Shakespeare

at Phillips Collection, Washington


ICP Announces Infitity Awards


Hal Fischer: Gay Semiotics

at Cherry and Martin, Los Angeles


Simone Lueck: American Movie

at Kopeikin Gallery, Los Angeles


Brian Wallis Leaving ICP


Esko Männikkö: Time Flies

at Yancey Richardson, New York


New Director for Paris Photo


Visibility Machines: Harun Farocki and Trevor Paglen

at Gallery 400, Chicago


January
Drew Sawyer at Columbus Museum of Art


Mark Klett: Camino del Diablo

at Pace/MacGill Gallery, New York


The Return to Reason

at Gallery Wendi Norris, San Francisco


Gordon Parks: Segregation Story, High Museum of Art and Jackson Fine Art; Gordon Parks: American Champion, Arnika Dawkins Gallery

at High Museum of Art, Atlanta


Edmund Teske

at Gitterman Gallery, New York


Classic Photographs Los Angeles


Library of Congress Acquires Camilo José Vergara Archive


Photo LA's 24th Edition


The Maine Photo Project Debuts this Month


Eastman House on YouTube


Sotheby's Denise Bethel Is Stepping Down


2014
December
Bulger Gallery Acquires Vivian Maier Collection


Sarah Sudhoff Joins Houston Center for Photography


Mitch Dobrowner: Still Earth | Storms

at Photo-Eye Gallery, Santa Fe


Phil Stern, 1919-2014


Arthur Leipzig, 1918-2014


Eva Respini Moves to Boston's ICA


MoMA Shows Thomas Walther Collection


Art Fairs in Miami


Lorenzo Vitturi: Dalston Anatomy

at Yossi Milo Gallery, New York


November
Larry Sultan: Here and Home

at LACMA, Los Angeles


Lewis Baltz, 1945-2014


Fahey/Klein Opens New Space


RISC Benefit Auction Open Now


Orit Raff: Priming

at Julie Saul Gallery, New York


Lucien Clergue, 1934-2014


Sandro Miller: Malkovich, Malkovich, Malkovich: Homage to Photographic Masters

at Catherine Edelman Gallery, Chicago


Paris Photo-Aperture PhotoBook Awards


Sunil Gupta: Out and About: New York and New Delhi

at sepiaEYE, New York


Builder Levy: Photographer

at Arnika Dawkins Gallery, Atlanta


Mayumi Lake: Latent Heat

at Miyako Yoshinaga Gallery, New York


Special Sale of Magnum Photos


New Space for Foley Gallery


Juan Fernando Herrán Win Prix Pictet Commission


Maurice Ortega to Head Curatorial Assistance


October
David Armstrong, 1954-2014


Lucie Awards Announced


New Home for Camera Club of NY


Philip Gefter Publishes Biography of Sam Wagstaff


Fred Ritchin New Dean at ICP


C/O Berlin Opens in Amerika Haus


René Burri, 1933-2014


Joseph Sywenkyj Wins Eugene Smith Grant


United States Artist Fellowships Announced


Ray Metzker, 1931-2014


Lois Conner: The Long View

at Gitterman Gallery, New York


Howard Greenberg / Steidl


Magic on Earth: Jean-Claude Moschetti

at Mariane Ibrahim Gallery, Seattle


Blind Spot | Griffin Editions Project Space


Shannon Ebner: Public Surface Pattern

at Altman Siegel Gallery, San Francisco


Ruud van Empel: New Work

at Jackson Fine Art, Atlanta


Getty Acquires Chris Killip Photographs


Samuel Fosso

at Walther Collection Project Space, New York


September
Yvonne Venegas: San Pedro Garza Garcia

at Shoshana Wayne Gallery, Santa Monica


Guarapuava: Valdir Cruz

at Throckmorton Fine Art, New York


ICP to Bowery


Whitney Museum Gets Major Photography Gift


Amon Carter Museum Digitizes Trove of Artworks


Climate Week NYC at ICP


Filter Photo Festival


Richard Mosse at Indianapolis Museum of Contemporary Art


Ernest Cole: Photographer

at Grey Art Gallery, New York


August Sander: Just Women / Jess T. Dugan: Every Breath We Drew

at Gallery Kayafas, Boston


August
Photo Shanghai Debuts


Kasher|Potamkin Launches New Gallery/Boutique


July
Wynn Bullock: Revelations

at High Museum of Art, Atlanta


Where There's Smoke. John Gossage: Who Do You Love

at Fraenkel Gallery, San Francisco


Allan Sekula: Ship of Fools

at Christopher Grimes Gallery, Santa Monica


Cantor Art Center Receives Warhol Archive


Jack Leigh: Full Circle, Low Country Photographs, 1972-2004

at SCAD Museum of Art, Savannah


Josef Koudelka: Nationality Doubtful

at Art Institute of Chicago, Chicago


Stephen Wirtz Gallery Closing


Justin Kimball: Where We Find Ourselves

at Carroll And Sons, Boston


Jacques Sonck: Archetypes

at L. Parker Stephenson Photographs, New York


The Invisible Photograph


Getty Acquires Robert McElroy Archive


Oresick Joins Silver Eye Center


Liz Deschenes Awarded Rappaport Prize


New Avedon App


Bonjour Arles!


Doug Hall: Bodies in Space

at Benrubi Gallery, New York


Cahiers d'Art Devoted to Sugimoto


Photo Espana Prize Goes to Aitor Lara


June
Anthony Friedkin: The Gay Essay

at de Young Museum, San Francisco


2014 Prix HSBC Awarded to Two Photographers


Rudolf Kicken, 1947-2014


"Biggest Photography Class in History"


Puppies and Pictures


Domesticated: Photographs by Amy Stein

at National Academy of Sciences, Washington


Steel Stillman: Incidents, 1969-2014

at Show Room Gowanus, Brooklyn


Callahan Collection Donated to Vancouver Art Gallery


Brandon Thibodeaux Wins Michael P. Smith Grant


Roger Mayne, 1929-2014


The Fence Goes on View in Brooklyn


Ka-Man Tse Wins Robert Giard Fellowship


Multiple Exposures: Jewelry and Photography / The Embroidered Image

at Museum of Arts and Design / Robert Mann Gallery, New York


Tim Barber: Relations

at Capricious 88, New York


May
Michael Flomen: Wild Nights

at Boite Noire Gallery, West Hollywood


Sze Tsung Leong: Horizons

at Yossi Milo Gallery, New York


Portland Art Museum Acquires Robert Adams Photographs


Michael Schmidt, 1945-2014


Paul Anthony Smith: Mangos and Crab

at Carrie Secrist Gallery, Chicago


Michael Schmidt Wins Prix Pictet


Jaimie Warren

at SF Camerawork, San Francisco


Symposium at Getty Celebrates 175th Anniversary of Photography


Zoe Leonard Receives Buckbaum Award


Andre Serrano Creates Public Art Project


Luigi Ghirri: La Città

at Matthew Marks Gallery (LA), Los Angeles


Richard Mosse Wins Deutsche Börse Prize


Poetics of Light: Pinhole Photography

at New Mexico History Museum, Santa Fe


Prix Pictet Finalists On View at V&A


Richard Renaldi: Touching Strangers / This Grand Show


Hillman Photography Initiative Explores Future of Photography


Walking in Their Shoes


Mark Ruwedel Wins Scotiabank Photography Award


April
Gabor Kerekes, 1945-2014


Major Gifts to High Museum


Hiroshi Sugimoto Wins Isamu Noguchi Prize


Carolle Bénitah: Photos-Souvenirs

at Sous Les Etoiles Gallery, New York


A New Space for Photo-Eye


Maroesjka Lavigne: Island

at Robert Mann Gallery, New York


George Dureau, 1931-2014


More AIPAD Picks from Elisabeth Biondi


Elisabeth Biondi's AIPAD Picks


Sarah Schmerler's Picks from AIPAD


2014 Guggenheim Fellowships


Lisa Sette Relocating


Photo Eye: Avant-Garde Photography in Europe

at Museum of Fine Arts, Boston


Lower East Side Photo Walk


Roe Ethridge: Sacrifice Your Body

at Andrew Kreps Gallery, New York


March
Laurie Simmons: Kigurumi, Dollers and How We See

at Salon 94 Bowery, New York


Getty Museum Acquires Tress Photographs


Amy Elkins Wins Aperture Portfolio Prize


Moutoussamy-Ashe Photos Go to Smithsonian


Walead Beshty: Selected Bodies of Work

at Regen Projects, Los Angeles


Public Intimacy: Art and Other Ordinary Acts in South Africa

at Yerba Buena Center for the Arts, San Francisco


Prince/Cariou Case Settled


Daniel Gordon Wins Paul Huf Award


New Photo Gallery in Williamsburg


ICP on the Move


National Gallery of Art Receives Gift of Photographs


Jamie Warren Wins Baum Award


Chloe Dewe Mathews Wins Gardner Fellowship


Matthew Pillsbury: Nate and Me

at Sasha Wolf Gallery, New York


Getty Images Opens Up Library


Paula McCartney: A Field Guide to Snow and Ice

at Klompching Gallery, Brooklyn


American Cool

at National Portrait Gallery, Washington, D.C.


February
Steichen/Warhol: Picturing Fame

at Block Museum of Art, Evanston


ICP Announces Infinity Award Winners


Onward in Philly


Samuel Fosso Photographs Rescued


J. Shimon & J. Lindemann: We Go From Where We Know

at John Michael Kohler Art Center, Sheboygan


John Stanmeyer Wins World Press Photo Award


Not Your Grandmother's Librarian


Patrick Nagatani: Outer and Inner: Contemplations on the Physical and the Spiritual

at Andrew Smith Gallery (annex), Santa Fe


New Photo Gallery in Boston


Fred McDarrah: Save the Village

at Steven Kasher Gallery, New York


J.D. 'Okhai Ojeikere, 1930-2014


Kevin Cooley and Phillip Andrew Lewis: Unexplored Territory

at Kopeikin Gallery, Los Angeles


January
Public Art Project Highlights the Boroughs


Carrie Mae Weems: Three Decades of Photography and Video

at Guggenheim Museum, New York


Getty Acquires Pictorialist Photographs


Peter Hujar: Love & Lust

at Fraenkel Gallery, San Francisco


Child Identified in 1908 Lewis Hine Photo


Heather Snider Joins SF Camerawork


The Sochi Project: An Atlas of War and Tourism in the Caucasus

at DePaul Art Museum, Chicago


Phillip Prodger Joins London's National Portrait Gallery


Tanya Marcuse: Fallen

at Julie Saul Gallery, New York


Joshua Chuang Joins CCP


Sophie Calle: Last Seen

at Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum, Boston


Danielle Durchslag: Relative Unknowns

at Denny Gallery, New York


Carnegie Museum Founds Hillman Photography Initiative


Soo Kim Awarded Gutmann Fellowship


Symposium on March on Washington


2013
December
November
Balthus: The Last Studies

at Gagosian Gallery (Mad Ave), New York


Saul Leiter, 1923-2013


Maine Philanthropists Give Collection to Portland Museum of Art


Daniel Morel Wins Suit Against Getty Images/AFP


Sean McFarland: Glass Mountains

at Stephen Wirtz Gallery, San Francisco


John Divola: As Far As I Could get

at Santa Barbara Museum of Art, LACMA, Pomona Museum of Art,


Eileen Quinlan: Curtains

at Miguel Abreu Gallery, New York


ICP Names New Executive Director


Clarence John Laughlin Award Announced


Prix Pictet Shortlist Announced


And the Winner Is ....


Libération's Powerful Homage to Photography


Tanja Hollander: The Landscapes of Are You Really My Friend?

at Carroll And Sons, Boston


War/Photography: Images of Armed Conflict and its Aftermath

at Brooklyn Museum of Art, Brooklyn


Lisa Hostetler to Eastman House


Dispatched to Texas


Finding Vivian Maier


Queens Museum Reopens with Photos by Jeff Chien-Hsing Liao


New E-Book from Library of Congress


Hello, Goodbye


October
Iké Udé: Style and Sympathies

at Leila Heller Gallery, New York


Deborah Turbeville, 1932-2013


ICP Celebrates Robert Capa's Centenary


Of Walking

at Museum of Contemporary Photography, Chicago


Here is New York


Polly Borland: You

at PK Shop, New York


Exhibition Showcases Martin Weinstein's Collection


They Are Us: Animal Identity and the Anthropomorphic Urge

at Rick Wester Fine Art, New York


Roxana Marcoci Named Senior Curator at MoMA


Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, Acquires Manfred Heiting Photo Book Collection


Documerica Looks Back


Matthew Porter: Greet the Dust

at M+B Gallery, Los Angeles


George Tice: 60 Years of Photography

at Nailya Alexander Gallery, New York


September
Sebastiaan Bremer

at Edwynn Houk Gallery, New York


Carrie Mae Weems Is a MacArthur Genius


We Shall: Photographs by Paul D'Amato

at DePaul Art Museum, Chicago


She Who Tells a Story: Women Photographers from Iran and the Arab World

at Museum of Fine Arts, Boston


Malcolm Daniel Heading to Texas


Ryan McGinley: Yearbook

at Ratio 3, San Francisco


Brian Sholis Joins Cincinnati Art Museum


Pieter Hugo: Kin

at Yossi Milo Gallery, New York


Adieu to Le Journal de la Photographie


Nadia Sablin Wins Firecracker Photography Award


Getty Acquires Baltz Archive


August
Ray Metzker: Shadow Catcher

at Andrew Smith Gallery, Santa Fe


Guillermo Santos: La Ciudad Blanca

at Fotografica Bogota 2013,


The Getty Shares Its Collections


Inez & Vinoodh

at Gagosian Gallery (LA), Beverly Hills


July
Christian Houge: Shadow Within

at Hosfelt Gallery, San Francisco


Party Picks: Estate of Jimmy DeSana

at Salon 94 Bowery, New York


In The Studio

at John Messinger, East Hampton


That Which Is: Marcia Lippman

at KMR Arts, Washington Depot


Ben Lifson, 1941-2013


Jan Banning: Down and Out in the South

at Hagedorn Foundation Gallery, Atlanta


Tom Wood: Men and Women

at Thomas Erben Gallery, New York


From the Ground Up: The Tent Camera Photographs of Abelardo Morell

at Stephen Daiter Gallery, Chicago


Portion Control: Chrisopher Boffoli

at Winston Wächter Fine Art, New York


June
Bing Wright: Broken Mirror/Evening Sky

at James Harris Gallery, Seattle


A Different Kind of Order: The International Center of Photography Triennial

at International Center of Photography, New York


JR / Jose Parla, Wrinkles of the City, Havana Cuba

at Bryce Wolkowitz Gallery, New York


May
David Hilliard: The Tale is True

at Carroll And Sons, Boston


Japan's Modern Divide: Photographs by Hiroshi Hamaya and Kansuke Yamamoto

at Getty Center, Los Angeles


Michael Jang: The Jangs

at Stephen Wirtz Gallery, San Francisco


David Levinthal: War Games

at Corcoran Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C.


Mike Brodie's Period of Juvenile Prosperity


Spectator Sports

at Museum of Contemporary Photography, Chicago


Joshua Lutz: Hesitating Beauty

at ClampArt, New York


April
Shiprock and Mont St. Michel: Photographs by William Clift

at New Mexico Museum of Art, Santa Fe


Garry Winogrand

at SFMOMA, San Francisco


Liliana Porter: 1973

at Barbara Krakow Gallery, Boston


In The Studio

at Dillon DeWaters, Brooklyn


AIPAD's Photography Show


Bruce Davidson


March
Bill Brandt: Shadow and Light

at Museum of Modern Art, New York


Iwan Baan: The Way We Live

at Perry Rubenstein Gallery, Los Angeles


Suburbia

at Hagedorn Foundation Gallery, Atlanta


Julie Weitz

at The Suburban, Oak Park


Armory Show 2013

at Armory Show, New York


Scope New York 2013

at SCOPE New York, New York


ADAA Art Show 2013

at ADAA Art Show, New York


Shooting Stars: Publicity Stills from Early Hollywood and Portraits by Andy Warhol

at Corcoran Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C.


February
Topsy Turvy in Madison Square Park


JoAnn Verburg: Present Tense

at G. Gibson Gallery, Seattle


Miles Barth Joins Artnet


The Unphotographable

at Fraenkel Gallery, San Francisco


Katrina del Mar: Girls Girls Girls

at Participant, Inc., New York


Robin Rhode: Take Your Mind off the Street

at Lehmann Maupin (Chelsea), New York


Arne Svenson: The Neighbors

at Western Project, Culver City


January
Silvio Wolf: Us

at Bruce Silverstein Gallery, New York


Beat Memories: The Photographs of Allen Ginsberg

at Grey Art Gallery, New York


Katherine Bussard Named Curator at
Princeton Art Museum


Catherine Wagner: trans/literate.

at Stephen Wirtz Gallery, San Francisco


Karl Baden: Roadside Attractions

at Miller Yezerski Gallery, Boston


Viviane Sassen on View


January is for Hot Shots


Richard Pare: The Lost Vanguard: Soviet Modernist Architecture, 1922–32

at Graham Foundation, Chicago


2012
December
Faking it: Manipulated Photography Before Photoshop

at Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York


Idris Khan: New Photographs

at Fraenkel Gallery, San Francisco


Jessica Eaton: Polytopes

at M+B Gallery, Los Angeles


Nadav Kander: Yangtze: The Long River

at Flowers, New York


Ori Gersht: History Repeating

at Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, Boston


Attachments

at The Hole, New York


1979:1—2012:21: Jan Tichy Works with the MoCP Collection

at Museum of Contemporary Photography, Chicago


Bonni Benrubi, 1953-2012


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