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Doug Hall: Love and Architecture

Rena Bransten Gallery, San Francisco


Doug Hall, Olympia of the Department Store, 1991/2015. Courtesy Rena Bransten Projects

Since the 1970s, Doug Hall’s work has addressed large power structures, from presidential politics to literal voltage, as seen in his notorious 1987 installation, The Terrible Uncertainty of the Thing Described, currently on view at the San Francisco Art Institute as part of SFMOMA’s off-site programming. His interest in more subtle power dynamics is visible in a compact show of photographs at Rena Bransten through May 16. Working with photographs culled from projects realized over the last 25 years, Hall has composed an elusive, layered meditation on commerce, buildings, and romantic desire—as well as on the artist’s own career.

Hall has taken the physical gallery space-- a modest ground-level storefront—as inspiration. He utilizes the shop window to display Olympia of the Department Store, a 1991/2015 C-print of a reclining female mannequin in a swanky but eerily empty retail setting. Nearby Hall nods to Walter Benjamin in The First Chapter, 2015, a slightly larger-than-life image of an open book, which features, on the left page, an image of an enclosed arcade, and on the right, a statuesque nude who could have walked off a Helmut Newton shoot. This mixture of image and text is part of a stated reference to André Breton’s 1928 Nadja, pages of which Hall re-photographed for a 2015 triptych in which he groups images of a hotel, black leather gloves, and a public park, together forming a loose narrative of a kinky European tryst. 

Doug Hall, And then the torpor spread like smoke, 2015. Courtesy Rena Bransten Projects

The show has an intellectual vibe, tempered with more romantic imagery. This is perhaps best expressed in And then the torpor spread like smoke, 2015, an arrangement of nine smallish images -- of cigarette puffs, embracing couples, and fading flowers-- sourced from the Internet, itself an insidious form of information architecture. This works fits into a contemporary art vernacular, though, while others do not-- The Lonely Heart I 1989/2015, a grid of black-and-white photographs of gleaming suburban office towers and text panels featuring letters to advice columnists, feels anachronistic, an early example the artist’s dialogue with the Dusseldorf school of photographers. The gesture of tackling his archives seems promising at this point in his career, but Hall seems stymied by the gallery’s spatial restrictions. There’s just not enough room for his large themes and decades of material to coalesce. 

 

— By Glen Helfand  04/20/2015

Court Rules in Favor of Arne Svenson


Arne Svenson, from his series The Neighbors, 2012. 

A New York State Supreme Court has ruled in favor of photographer Arne Svenson, who was sued by a number of people he photographed with a telephoto lens for his series The Neighbors. After the work was shown at the Julie Saul Gallery in 2013, several of the subjects filed a lawsuit, alleging that the photographs violated their constitutional right to privacy. Svenson used a telephoto lens to take pictures of people inside their Manhattan apartments, without their knowledge. Svenson's latest series, The Workers, is on view at Julie Saul through May 30.

The verdict was based on Svenson’s first-amendment rights as an artist. The value of artistic ideas conveyed in an artworks are regarded as a matter of public interest, though the judges also described Svenson’s photographs as “disturbing,” according to artnet news.

 

— By Jean Dykstra  04/13/2015

2015 Guggenheim Fellows Announced


Richard Renaldi, from the series Touching Strangers. Renaldi is one of this year's Guggenheim Fellows.

Congratulations to the winners of this year’s Guggenheim Fellows, including the 12 photographers who were named fellows this year: Gary Briechle, Miles Coolidge, Susan Lipper, Susan Meiselas, Arno Rafael Minkkinen, Richard Renaldi, Stuart Rome, Richard Rothman, Moises Saman, Kim Stringfellow, William S. Sutton, and Terri Weifenbach.

 

— By Jean Dykstra  04/10/2015

Aperture Portfolio Prize Winner Announced


Drew Nikonowicz, from The World and Others Like I

Congratulations to Drew Nikonowicz, winner of the 2015 Aperture Portfolio Prize, for his series The World and Others Like It.  The series, in which he employs computer simulations as well as analog processes, focuses on the growing gap between reality and mediated fiction. The only human figure in his photographs of a fictional, possibly extraterrestrial  landscape is an astronaut.

— By Jean Dykstra  04/10/2015

Assaf Evron: The Sea Was Smooth, Perfectly Mirroring the Sky

Andrea Meislin Gallery, New York


Assaf Evron, Visual Pyramid after Alberti, 2013-2014. Courtesy Andrea Meislin Gallery

Assaf Evron’s work arrived with all its papers in order: prizes and commissions from Israel, the imprimatur of the Art Institute of Chicago, and a sheaf of art historical references, from Leon Batista Alberti and Albrecht Dürer to Robert Smithson.  The installation work looked forward to a time in the near future when photographers will become sculptors and installation artists, working outside the 2D box, and backward to a time when artists were polymathic investigators, combining the study of natural science, philosophy, and optics.  The pieces stood out from the wall or occupied the floor, and their connection to photographic roots felt attenuated, sometimes barely perceptible. 

Assaf Evron, Visual Pyramid after Alberti, 2013-2014. Courtesy Andrea Meislin Gallery

Evron’s work, on view at Andrea Meislin through May 2, focuses on perception and cognition – how do we see and how do we know what we see?  At the heart of the exhibition was a sculpture composed of a photographic stand with a cantilevered arm holding a piece of glass on which was printed the picture of a rainbow.  It was the reification of an illusion – a phenomenon that is purely optical, translated as a picture to a medium that is physical but transparent and reflective.  A thing was there but at its center was an illusion, a kind of nothing.  The theme was reflected in other works, including wall panels that bore images created by an infrared camera that captured the mapping effects of an X-Box Kinect.  In many ways this series, Visual Pyramid (After Alberti), presented the most challenges because it suggested so many things at once: design objects (they were carefully and even elaborately mounted), abstract photographs, virtual noise, pointillist drawing.  A handout essay by Abigail Winograd read: “The visual simplicity of Evron’s art belies an intricate working method.”  But that was not correct.  Nothing was belied.  Absent an explanation for each piece, there was no way to engage them substantively, a sure sign that the experience of the work lay elsewhere, in theory and in reflection.  As with so many installation works in contemporary art, what you saw was what you saw, but not necessarily what you got – perhaps the perfect summation of our uncertain relation to “the real” in a digital age.  

— By Lyle Rexer  04/10/2015

Joy Episalla: Street View Rear Window

Participant Inc, New York


Joy Episalla, from Garage series, 1989-2015. Courtesy Participant, Inc.

Hybrid in nature, Joy Episalla’s Street View Rear Window, on view at Participant through April 12, is a dynamic repositioning of photography as pushed into the idiom of sculpture. Made up of three discrete but conceptually interconnected works, they create a kind of optic rubric that interrogates perception. Not driven by content so much as lacing the art with it in ways at once poetic and process-driven, Episalla is most interested in creating open-ended situations that engage the viewer in the question of how we see or read things. Allowing a degree of perplexity to linger, Episalla deftly considers the possibilities of abstraction and representation latent within one another. 

The show opens with a suit of graphically strong photographs from her Garage series. The stark geometric designs on garage doors she photographed in 1989, visiting the retirement community of Sun City, Arizona, spin out a delightful assortment of unpredictable visual associations. Her large-scale black-and-white pictures of these doors act as a kind of tribute to how the language of modernism could infect even the most crushingly mundane details of suburban Americana. 

 Joy Episalla, Les Psychanalystes et le Marché, 2010-2015. Courtesy Participant, Inc.

 

For all their capacity to tease out myriad associations, the doors themselves are like apertures, drawing direct comparison to the camera shutter and the eye’s retina. This theme is echoed in Episalla’s quirky sculptural assemblage Arial View 3, in which a photogram of moving liquid lies atop a casual construction of Plexiglas panes and canvas. This bird’s-eye view is followed up in the back room installation of Les Psychanalystes et le Marche, a three-channel video projection taken from a balcony window in Paris of a day’s pedestrian choreography. 

A trace of melancholia belies the utter lack of sentimentality in Episalla’s work. It’s not always easy to grasp everything she’s telling us, but it is that very slipperiness that matters most, that gap between what looks so patently simple and the mass of complexity that underlies it. Episalla, who has been a member of the queer collective fierce pussy since 1991, first came to attention as an artist/activist deeply committed to ACT-UP in the eighties. With this legacy behind her, it is hard not to read this art as an intervention against the ways we race through life, a demand to slow down enough to be in the present, and to take each moment in time as a kind of Proustian paradigm of reflection. 

 

— By Carlo McCormick  04/10/2015

Library of Congress Acquires Civil War Stereographs


Lincoln's Funeral, Philadelphia. Courtesy Library of Congress

The Library of Congress has acquired a trove of Civil War stereographs from the Robin G. Stanford Collection.  The first 77 images are now online, including 12 stereographs of President Lincoln’s funeral procession through several cities and 65 images by Southern photographers showing South Carolina in 1860-61.

The Library of Congress acquired the collection through a purchase/gift from Robin G. Stanford of Houston.  During the past 40 years, Stanford has collected stereographs of both the Civil War and Texas. 

The 77 images now online include 12 from Lincoln’s funeral procession through Baltimore, Philadelphia, New York City, and Springfield, Illinois, among other cities. The images show the president’s casket in elaborate open-air hearses that passed through the main streets of the cities; buildings draped in mourning bunting; and crowds lined up to see the procession. 

 

— By Jean Dykstra  04/01/2015

Brian Weil, 1979-95: Being in the World

Participant Inc, New York


Brian Weil, Untitled, 1979-81. Courtesy Center for Creative Photography

When Brian Weil died in 1996, at age 41, art critic Roberta Smith wrote his New York Times obituary. The headline referred to him as the “Photographer Who Founded Needle Exchange,” giving prominence to his identity as a photographer. When Weil’s posthumous retrospective opened at the ICA in Philadelphia, two friends of his participated in a panel discussion. Ric Curtis, a criminal justice professor who helped Weil found the needle exchange, said he’d worked with Weil for years before knowing he was an artist. “Because everyone was an artist, no one talked about it,” said Patrick Moore, who participated in ACT UP with Weil. “There was a feeling that art was not a responsible response to the crisis.” 

Weil’s retrospective is at the Santa Monica Museum of Art through April 18, and documentation of his activism mingles with his gritty, searching photographs of kinky sex, homicide investigations, and Hasidic communities. Showing that Weil’s art and social efforts went hand in hand is part of the show’s goal, but much of Weil’s work has an unapologetic darkness to it that contrasts with the hopefulness of his social projects. He made his black-and-white images by re-photographing Super 8 footage he had shot, then scratching and overexposing the negatives. The resulting blurry, intentionally damaged photographs give his subjects an even greater sense of mystery. 

Brian Weil, Transvestite Safe Sex Outreach Worker, Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic, 1987. Courtesy Center for Creative Photography

For his Sex series, Weil placed ads in the Village Voice and fetish magazines. Images include two lithe, nude bodies in ski masks -- one female, one male – embracing with a goose between them. He followed homicide detectives around for his Miami Crime series, photographing over 60 crime scenes in a way that often makes it painfully clear how unprepared his subjects were to die.

 This work would read as more unpleasantly voyeuristic if not for the tender documentary images of people Weil met through his needle exchange project hanging nearby. He became involved in the needle exchange work in the mid-1980s because he anticipated, correctly, that intravenous drug users would soon be hit hard by the AIDS epidemic. These images suggest that the photographer was less voyeuristic and more intensely interested in understanding how people lived, died, and fought death. As a result, the show becomes about the weird ways in which darkness and goodness coexist.

— By Catherine Wagley  04/01/2015

Fatal Attraction: Piotr Uklánski Photographs

Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York


Piotr Uklánski, Untitled (Island), 1997. Courtesy Metropolitan Museum of Art

Moving to the United States after the fall of Communism, Polish artist Piotr Uklánski found a timely muse in the shape of Eastman Kodak’s The Joy of Photography, a how-to guide that coincidentally indexes the popular American taste of the era. In his 1997–2007 series of the same title, Uklánski plundered the book’s clichéd imagery en route to a tongue-in-cheek exploration of the medium and its meanings. Multiple entries in the series—in which the artist remade stock scenes for the camera—form the backbone of this flawed but fascinating survey of his photographic oeuvre.

Aspects of the exhibition, on view at the Met through August 16, feel constrained: The Nazis (1998), Uklánski’s unforgettable rogues gallery of uniformed bad guys from cinema and TV, is shown in an abbreviated version. There’s also a lapse in thematic logic in the shape of an elephantine fiber art sculpture, Untitled (Story of the Eye) (2013), the only non-photographic work in this section of the show. Gratifyingly, though, Fatal Attraction also includes two additional components housed in separate spaces in the Met, the first being an array of works selected by the artist from the museum’s collection. Plainly, Uklánski got carried away. He picked out works by everyone from Lucas Cranach to Laurie Simmons, articulating the intersection of corporeal beauty and horror, but the abundance of works overwhelms the space.

Piotr Uklánski, The Nazis, 1998. Courtesy Metropolitan Museum of Art

The second, more successfully sited addition to Fatal Attraction’s main display is suspended overhead in the museum’s entrance hall. Uklánski’s Untitled (Solidarnosc) (2007) is a pair of large photographic banners. One depicts three thousand Polish soldiers arranged into the shape of the logo of the pioneering non-Communist labor union; the second shows the same scene, shot in the Gdansk shipyard where Solidarity was founded, but as the participants begin to drift away from their places and the logo starts to dissolve. It’s a pointed critique of personal-political groupthink that gains immediacy from its bustling context.

 

— By Michael Wilson  03/31/2015

Yale Acquires Large 19th-Century Photography Collection


Photo by Kirsten Luce for the New York Times

Yale University’s Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library acquired one of the largest private collections of 19th-century American photography, primarily devoted to Abraham Lincoln and the Civil War. Yale made the purchase from the Meserve-Kunhardt Foundation, which has collected and preserved the photographs and other materials for five generations. The collection includes more than 57,000 prints and thousands of books, pamphlets, maps, and other ephemera. Highlights include a large-format albumen print of Lincoln by Alexander Gardner from 1863 and glass negative of Mathew Brady’s portrait of Lincoln with his son, Tad. 

The material will be divided between the Yale Art Museum and the Beinecke. The extensive collection has been the source for such projects as The Photographs of Abraham Lincoln, recently published by Steidl and edited by Peter W. Kunhardt, Jr., and Jeff Rosenheim’s 2013 exhibition at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, Photography and the American Civil War.

 

— By Jean Dykstra  03/30/2015

Toshio Shibata: Water Colors

Laurence Miller Gallery, New York


Toshio Shibata, Nikko City, Tochigi Prefecture, 2013. Courtesy Laurence Miller Gallery

In its traditional form, a haiku comprises two images or ideas, with a “cutting word,” or kireji, between them, which provides structural support to the poem. The lyrical, minimalist photographs in Toshio Shibata’s exhibition, Water Colors, on view at Laurence Miller Gallery through April 25, are like visual haikus, in which images of nature and manmade structures are contrasted, and Shibata’s distinct approach provides the connective tissue. 

Nature and the manmade never seem particularly at odds in these images, which were made mostly in northern Japan. Through Shibata’s lens, the dams, buoys, and sluices seem not like bastardizations of the landscape, but rather parts of a palette upon which nature can better present itself. In several images, for instance, the sweeping arcs of a line of orange buoys look like pearl necklaces in the waterscape. In Kofu City, Yamanashi Prefecture, the floats halt the wind on the water, causing the colors on either side to shift. This makes the surface, perhaps, more beautiful than it would have been untouched.

Toshio Shibata, Yonezawa City, Yamagata Prefecture, 2008. Courtesy Laurence Miller Gallery

All the photographs in this exhibition have been selected, from amongst nearly a decade of work, for their cropping below the skyline. Without this grounding contextual element, the scenes are free to become exercises in abstraction. Hanno City, Saitama Prefecture, for one, is made of stacked strips of shadow, water and steel, a modernist architecture all its own. 

All soft light and long exposures, the images here, as the exhibit’s title suggests, have the quality of watercolors, a product, most likely, of Shibata’s early education in painting. This effect is particularly pronounced in Shibata’s photographs of falling water, in which the steady streams are like white swatches of silk. Even as one imagines the roaring sound of the crashing falls from these imposing works of civil engineering, the quietness in Shibata’s vision reigns.

 

— By Jordan G. Teicher  03/27/2015

Dan Leers Appointed Photo Curator at Carnegie Museum


Photo by Katie Krauss

Pittsburgh native Dan Leers has been appointed curator of photography at the Carnegie Museum of Art, filling the shoes of Linda Benedict-Jones, the museum's first curator of photography who recently retired. 

Leers, who served as an advisor on contemporary African art for the 2013 Venice Biennale, was previously the Beaumont and Nancy Newhall Curatorial Fellow in the Museum of Modern Art’s photography department. Most recently, he has been an independent curator in New York City. He begins his new position on April 27.

 

— By Jean Dykstra  03/09/2015

Deborah Luster Is 2015 Gardner Fellow in Photography


Deborah Luster, St. Gabriel, Louisiana

Deborah Luster has been named the 2015 Robert Gardner Fellow in Photography at Harvard’s Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology. The Fellowship carries a $50,000 stipend to begin or complete a project, followed by the publication of a book. 

Luster is best known for One Big Self, her book on prisoners in Louisiana. For her fellowship year, Luster is continuing her investigation into violence, place, and prison. 

 

— By Jean Dykstra  03/06/2015

Ryerson Acquires Berenice Abbott Archive


Berenice Abbott, Inference Pattern, Cambridge Massachusetts. Courtesy Ryerson Image Centre

Toronto’s Ryerson Image Centre has acquired the archive of Berenice Abbott, containing more than 6,000 images and 7,000 negatives. The archive was purchased from the Abbott estate by a group of philanthropists who donated it to the Ryerson. The archive also includes letters, notebooks, and other ephemera. 

RIC Director Paul Roth told the Globe and Mail that his institution plans to collaborate with the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and the Museum of the City of New York, which both have substantial archives of Abbott’s work, on future projects.

 

— By Jean Dykstra  03/06/2015

Alec Soth: Songbook

Sean Kelly Gallery, New York


Alec Soth, Bill, Sandusky, Ohio, 2012. © Alec Soth, Courtesy Sean Kelly Gallery

In Sleeping by the Mississippi (2004) and Broken Manual (2013), Alec Soth tended to gravitate toward isolated individuals – outcasts or misfits who had gone off the grid in one way or another. In many ways, the individualism and self-sufficiency – and isolation – that were the subtexts of his pictures are conventionally American traits. But so is the notion of community, something Soth explores in his latest work, Songbook, on view at the Sean Kelly Gallery through March 14 (and at Fraenkel Gallery in San Francisco and Weinstein Gallery in Minneapolis through April 4). 

The work is a shift for Soth as well in his use of black and white instead of color. From 2011 to 2014, Soth and journalist Brad Zellar crisscrossed the country in the guise of small-town newspaper reporters to photograph social clubs, high school proms, football games, and beauty contests. Soth abandoned the tripod and view camera he had been using in order to capture scenes and moments quickly and unobtrusively, like the gay couple slow dancing at a prom in Cleveland, or the young man doing a heart-stopping back dive into a rocky watering hole in upstate New York. The black and white photographs give a nostalgic cast to some of the pictures: the genial, soft-shoe Bill, Sandusky, Ohio, was photographed in 2012, but he could have stepped out of the 1950s. 

Alec Soth, Near Kaaterskill Falls, NY, 2012. © Alec Soth, Courtesy Sean Kelly Gallery

Soth is a thoughtful photographer whose references are not accidental, from the Weegee-like flash of some of the photographs to his itinerant exploration of the country’s social fabric, recalling Walker Evans or Robert Frank. The title of the work suggests the mid-century America of the Great American Songbook, with its can-do, optimistic soundtrack by George Gershwin, Hoagy Carmichael, Irving Berlin, and Richard Rodgers. 

It’s an optimism that occasionally falters. One photograph shows a solitary man making his way across the sun-blasted plaza of the Facebook headquarters in Menlo Park, California. It’s hard not to read it as a comment on the isolation of modern day society, despite our many Facebook “friends.” But Soth’s photographs of cowboys and couples and nondescript hotels are open to interpretation by design. Soth and Zellar originally published the photographs, along with Zellar’s text, in LBM Dispatches (so named for Soth's Little Brown Mushroom books) from each region they visited. For Songbook, Soth stripped away the narratives and let the images stand on their own.  They speak of connection, alienation, poverty and community – telling a story as complex as the country itself. 

 

— By Jean Dykstra  03/02/2015

archives

2015
December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
Doug Hall: Love and Architecture

at Rena Bransten Gallery, San Francisco


Court Rules in Favor of Arne Svenson


2015 Guggenheim Fellows Announced


Aperture Portfolio Prize Winner Announced


Assaf Evron: The Sea Was Smooth, Perfectly Mirroring the Sky

at Andrea Meislin Gallery, New York


Joy Episalla: Street View Rear Window

at Participant Inc, New York


Library of Congress Acquires Civil War Stereographs


Brian Weil, 1979-95: Being in the World


March
Fatal Attraction: Piotr Uklánski Photographs

at Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York


Yale Acquires Large 19th-Century Photography Collection


Toshio Shibata: Water Colors

at Laurence Miller Gallery, New York


Dan Leers Appointed Photo Curator at Carnegie Museum


Deborah Luster Is 2015 Gardner Fellow in Photography


Ryerson Acquires Berenice Abbott Archive


Alec Soth: Songbook

at Sean Kelly Gallery, New York


February
Man Ray: Human Equations: A Journey from Mathematics to Shakespeare

at Phillips Collection, Washington, D.C.


ICP Announces Infitity Awards


Hal Fischer: Gay Semiotics

at Cherry and Martin, Los Angeles


Simone Lueck: American Movie

at Kopeikin Gallery, Los Angeles


Brian Wallis Leaving ICP


Esko Männikkö: Time Flies

at Yancey Richardson, New York


New Director for Paris Photo


Visibility Machines: Harun Farocki and Trevor Paglen

at Gallery 400, Chicago


January
Drew Sawyer at Columbus Museum of Art


Mark Klett: Camino del Diablo

at Pace/MacGill Gallery, New York


The Return to Reason

at Gallery Wendi Norris, San Francisco


Gordon Parks: Segregation Story, High Museum of Art and Jackson Fine Art; Gordon Parks: American Champion, Arnika Dawkins Gallery

at High Museum of Art, Atlanta


Edmund Teske

at Gitterman Gallery, New York


Classic Photographs Los Angeles


Library of Congress Acquires Camilo José Vergara Archive


Photo LA's 24th Edition


The Maine Photo Project Debuts this Month


Eastman House on YouTube


Sotheby's Denise Bethel Is Stepping Down


2014
December
Bulger Gallery Acquires Vivian Maier Collection


Sarah Sudhoff Joins Houston Center for Photography


Mitch Dobrowner: Still Earth | Storms

at Photo-Eye Gallery, Santa Fe


Phil Stern, 1919-2014


Arthur Leipzig, 1918-2014


Eva Respini Moves to Boston's ICA


MoMA Shows Thomas Walther Collection


Art Fairs in Miami


Lorenzo Vitturi: Dalston Anatomy

at Yossi Milo Gallery, New York


November
Larry Sultan: Here and Home

at LACMA, Los Angeles


Lewis Baltz, 1945-2014


Fahey/Klein Opens New Space


RISC Benefit Auction Open Now


Orit Raff: Priming

at Julie Saul Gallery, New York


Lucien Clergue, 1934-2014


Sandro Miller: Malkovich, Malkovich, Malkovich: Homage to Photographic Masters

at Catherine Edelman Gallery, Chicago


Paris Photo-Aperture PhotoBook Awards


Sunil Gupta: Out and About: New York and New Delhi

at sepiaEYE, New York


Builder Levy: Photographer

at Arnika Dawkins Gallery, Atlanta


Mayumi Lake: Latent Heat

at Miyako Yoshinaga Gallery, New York


Special Sale of Magnum Photos


New Space for Foley Gallery


Juan Fernando Herrán Win Prix Pictet Commission


Maurice Ortega to Head Curatorial Assistance


October
David Armstrong, 1954-2014


Lucie Awards Announced


New Home for Camera Club of NY


Philip Gefter Publishes Biography of Sam Wagstaff


Fred Ritchin New Dean at ICP


C/O Berlin Opens in Amerika Haus


René Burri, 1933-2014


Joseph Sywenkyj Wins Eugene Smith Grant


United States Artist Fellowships Announced


Ray Metzker, 1931-2014


Lois Conner: The Long View

at Gitterman Gallery, New York


Howard Greenberg / Steidl


Magic on Earth: Jean-Claude Moschetti

at Mariane Ibrahim Gallery, Seattle


Blind Spot | Griffin Editions Project Space


Shannon Ebner: Public Surface Pattern

at Altman Siegel Gallery, San Francisco


Ruud van Empel: New Work

at Jackson Fine Art, Atlanta


Getty Acquires Chris Killip Photographs


Samuel Fosso

at Walther Collection Project Space, New York


September
Yvonne Venegas: San Pedro Garza Garcia

at Shoshana Wayne Gallery, Santa Monica


Guarapuava: Valdir Cruz

at Throckmorton Fine Art, New York


ICP to Bowery


Whitney Museum Gets Major Photography Gift


Amon Carter Museum Digitizes Trove of Artworks


Climate Week NYC at ICP


Filter Photo Festival


Richard Mosse at Indianapolis Museum of Contemporary Art


Ernest Cole: Photographer

at Grey Art Gallery, New York


August Sander: Just Women / Jess T. Dugan: Every Breath We Drew

at Gallery Kayafas, Boston


August
Photo Shanghai Debuts


Kasher|Potamkin Launches New Gallery/Boutique


July
Wynn Bullock: Revelations

at High Museum of Art, Atlanta


Where There's Smoke. John Gossage: Who Do You Love

at Fraenkel Gallery, San Francisco


Allan Sekula: Ship of Fools

at Christopher Grimes Gallery, Santa Monica


Cantor Art Center Receives Warhol Archive


Jack Leigh: Full Circle, Low Country Photographs, 1972-2004

at SCAD Museum of Art, Savannah


Josef Koudelka: Nationality Doubtful

at Art Institute of Chicago, Chicago


Stephen Wirtz Gallery Closing


Justin Kimball: Where We Find Ourselves

at Carroll And Sons, Boston


Jacques Sonck: Archetypes

at L. Parker Stephenson Photographs, New York


The Invisible Photograph


Getty Acquires Robert McElroy Archive


Oresick Joins Silver Eye Center


Liz Deschenes Awarded Rappaport Prize


New Avedon App


Bonjour Arles!


Doug Hall: Bodies in Space

at Benrubi Gallery, New York


Cahiers d'Art Devoted to Sugimoto


Photo Espana Prize Goes to Aitor Lara


June
Anthony Friedkin: The Gay Essay

at de Young Museum, San Francisco


2014 Prix HSBC Awarded to Two Photographers


Rudolf Kicken, 1947-2014


"Biggest Photography Class in History"


Puppies and Pictures


Domesticated: Photographs by Amy Stein

at National Academy of Sciences, Washington


Steel Stillman: Incidents, 1969-2014

at Show Room Gowanus, Brooklyn


Callahan Collection Donated to Vancouver Art Gallery


Brandon Thibodeaux Wins Michael P. Smith Grant


Roger Mayne, 1929-2014


The Fence Goes on View in Brooklyn


Ka-Man Tse Wins Robert Giard Fellowship


Multiple Exposures: Jewelry and Photography / The Embroidered Image

at Museum of Arts and Design / Robert Mann Gallery, New York


Tim Barber: Relations

at Capricious 88, New York


May
Michael Flomen: Wild Nights

at Boite Noire Gallery, West Hollywood


Sze Tsung Leong: Horizons

at Yossi Milo Gallery, New York


Portland Art Museum Acquires Robert Adams Photographs


Michael Schmidt, 1945-2014


Paul Anthony Smith: Mangos and Crab

at Carrie Secrist Gallery, Chicago


Michael Schmidt Wins Prix Pictet


Jaimie Warren

at SF Camerawork, San Francisco


Symposium at Getty Celebrates 175th Anniversary of Photography


Zoe Leonard Receives Buckbaum Award


Andre Serrano Creates Public Art Project


Luigi Ghirri: La Città

at Matthew Marks Gallery (LA), Los Angeles


Richard Mosse Wins Deutsche Börse Prize


Poetics of Light: Pinhole Photography

at New Mexico History Museum, Santa Fe


Prix Pictet Finalists On View at V&A


Richard Renaldi: Touching Strangers / This Grand Show


Hillman Photography Initiative Explores Future of Photography


Walking in Their Shoes


Mark Ruwedel Wins Scotiabank Photography Award


April
Gabor Kerekes, 1945-2014


Major Gifts to High Museum


Hiroshi Sugimoto Wins Isamu Noguchi Prize


Carolle Bénitah: Photos-Souvenirs

at Sous Les Etoiles Gallery, New York


A New Space for Photo-Eye


Maroesjka Lavigne: Island

at Robert Mann Gallery, New York


George Dureau, 1931-2014


More AIPAD Picks from Elisabeth Biondi


Elisabeth Biondi's AIPAD Picks


Sarah Schmerler's Picks from AIPAD


2014 Guggenheim Fellowships


Lisa Sette Relocating


Photo Eye: Avant-Garde Photography in Europe

at Museum of Fine Arts, Boston


Lower East Side Photo Walk


Roe Ethridge: Sacrifice Your Body

at Andrew Kreps Gallery, New York


March
Laurie Simmons: Kigurumi, Dollers and How We See

at Salon 94 Bowery, New York


Getty Museum Acquires Tress Photographs


Amy Elkins Wins Aperture Portfolio Prize


Moutoussamy-Ashe Photos Go to Smithsonian


Walead Beshty: Selected Bodies of Work

at Regen Projects, Los Angeles


Public Intimacy: Art and Other Ordinary Acts in South Africa

at Yerba Buena Center for the Arts, San Francisco


Prince/Cariou Case Settled


Daniel Gordon Wins Paul Huf Award


New Photo Gallery in Williamsburg


ICP on the Move


National Gallery of Art Receives Gift of Photographs


Jamie Warren Wins Baum Award


Chloe Dewe Mathews Wins Gardner Fellowship


Matthew Pillsbury: Nate and Me

at Sasha Wolf Gallery, New York


Getty Images Opens Up Library


Paula McCartney: A Field Guide to Snow and Ice

at Klompching Gallery, Brooklyn


American Cool

at National Portrait Gallery, Washington, D.C.


February
Steichen/Warhol: Picturing Fame

at Block Museum of Art, Evanston


ICP Announces Infinity Award Winners


Onward in Philly


Samuel Fosso Photographs Rescued


J. Shimon & J. Lindemann: We Go From Where We Know

at John Michael Kohler Art Center, Sheboygan


John Stanmeyer Wins World Press Photo Award


Not Your Grandmother's Librarian


Patrick Nagatani: Outer and Inner: Contemplations on the Physical and the Spiritual

at Andrew Smith Gallery (annex), Santa Fe


New Photo Gallery in Boston


Fred McDarrah: Save the Village

at Steven Kasher Gallery, New York


J.D. 'Okhai Ojeikere, 1930-2014


Kevin Cooley and Phillip Andrew Lewis: Unexplored Territory

at Kopeikin Gallery, Los Angeles


January
Public Art Project Highlights the Boroughs


Carrie Mae Weems: Three Decades of Photography and Video

at Guggenheim Museum, New York


Getty Acquires Pictorialist Photographs


Peter Hujar: Love & Lust

at Fraenkel Gallery, San Francisco


Child Identified in 1908 Lewis Hine Photo


Heather Snider Joins SF Camerawork


The Sochi Project: An Atlas of War and Tourism in the Caucasus

at DePaul Art Museum, Chicago


Phillip Prodger Joins London's National Portrait Gallery


Tanya Marcuse: Fallen

at Julie Saul Gallery, New York


Joshua Chuang Joins CCP


Sophie Calle: Last Seen

at Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum, Boston


Danielle Durchslag: Relative Unknowns

at Denny Gallery, New York


Carnegie Museum Founds Hillman Photography Initiative


Soo Kim Awarded Gutmann Fellowship


Symposium on March on Washington


2013
December
November
Balthus: The Last Studies

at Gagosian Gallery (Mad Ave), New York


Saul Leiter, 1923-2013


Maine Philanthropists Give Collection to Portland Museum of Art


Daniel Morel Wins Suit Against Getty Images/AFP


Sean McFarland: Glass Mountains

at Stephen Wirtz Gallery, San Francisco


John Divola: As Far As I Could get

at Santa Barbara Museum of Art, LACMA, Pomona Museum of Art,


Eileen Quinlan: Curtains

at Miguel Abreu Gallery, New York


ICP Names New Executive Director


Clarence John Laughlin Award Announced


Prix Pictet Shortlist Announced


And the Winner Is ....


Libération's Powerful Homage to Photography


Tanja Hollander: The Landscapes of Are You Really My Friend?

at Carroll And Sons, Boston


War/Photography: Images of Armed Conflict and its Aftermath

at Brooklyn Museum of Art, Brooklyn


Lisa Hostetler to Eastman House


Dispatched to Texas


Finding Vivian Maier


Queens Museum Reopens with Photos by Jeff Chien-Hsing Liao


New E-Book from Library of Congress


Hello, Goodbye


October
Iké Udé: Style and Sympathies

at Leila Heller Gallery, New York


Deborah Turbeville, 1932-2013


ICP Celebrates Robert Capa's Centenary


Of Walking

at Museum of Contemporary Photography, Chicago


Here is New York


Polly Borland: You

at PK Shop, New York


Exhibition Showcases Martin Weinstein's Collection


They Are Us: Animal Identity and the Anthropomorphic Urge

at Rick Wester Fine Art, New York


Roxana Marcoci Named Senior Curator at MoMA


Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, Acquires Manfred Heiting Photo Book Collection


Documerica Looks Back


Matthew Porter: Greet the Dust

at M+B Gallery, Los Angeles


George Tice: 60 Years of Photography

at Nailya Alexander Gallery, New York


September
Sebastiaan Bremer

at Edwynn Houk Gallery, New York


Carrie Mae Weems Is a MacArthur Genius


We Shall: Photographs by Paul D'Amato

at DePaul Art Museum, Chicago


She Who Tells a Story: Women Photographers from Iran and the Arab World

at Museum of Fine Arts, Boston


Malcolm Daniel Heading to Texas


Ryan McGinley: Yearbook

at Ratio 3, San Francisco


Brian Sholis Joins Cincinnati Art Museum


Pieter Hugo: Kin

at Yossi Milo Gallery, New York


Adieu to Le Journal de la Photographie


Nadia Sablin Wins Firecracker Photography Award


Getty Acquires Baltz Archive


August
Ray Metzker: Shadow Catcher

at Andrew Smith Gallery, Santa Fe


Guillermo Santos: La Ciudad Blanca

at Fotografica Bogota 2013,


The Getty Shares Its Collections


Inez & Vinoodh

at Gagosian Gallery (LA), Beverly Hills


July
Christian Houge: Shadow Within

at Hosfelt Gallery, San Francisco


Party Picks: Estate of Jimmy DeSana

at Salon 94 Bowery, New York


In The Studio

at John Messinger, East Hampton


That Which Is: Marcia Lippman

at KMR Arts, Washington Depot


Ben Lifson, 1941-2013


Jan Banning: Down and Out in the South

at Hagedorn Foundation Gallery, Atlanta


Tom Wood: Men and Women

at Thomas Erben Gallery, New York


From the Ground Up: The Tent Camera Photographs of Abelardo Morell

at Stephen Daiter Gallery, Chicago


Portion Control: Chrisopher Boffoli

at Winston Wächter Fine Art, New York


June
Bing Wright: Broken Mirror/Evening Sky

at James Harris Gallery, Seattle


A Different Kind of Order: The International Center of Photography Triennial

at International Center of Photography, New York


JR / Jose Parla, Wrinkles of the City, Havana Cuba

at Bryce Wolkowitz Gallery, New York


May
David Hilliard: The Tale is True

at Carroll And Sons, Boston


Japan's Modern Divide: Photographs by Hiroshi Hamaya and Kansuke Yamamoto

at Getty Center, Los Angeles


Michael Jang: The Jangs

at Stephen Wirtz Gallery, San Francisco


David Levinthal: War Games

at Corcoran Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C.


Mike Brodie's Period of Juvenile Prosperity


Spectator Sports

at Museum of Contemporary Photography, Chicago


Joshua Lutz: Hesitating Beauty

at ClampArt, New York


April
Shiprock and Mont St. Michel: Photographs by William Clift

at New Mexico Museum of Art, Santa Fe


Garry Winogrand

at SFMOMA, San Francisco


Liliana Porter: 1973

at Barbara Krakow Gallery, Boston


In The Studio

at Dillon DeWaters, Brooklyn


AIPAD's Photography Show


Bruce Davidson


March
Bill Brandt: Shadow and Light

at Museum of Modern Art, New York


Iwan Baan: The Way We Live

at Perry Rubenstein Gallery, Los Angeles


Suburbia

at Hagedorn Foundation Gallery, Atlanta


Julie Weitz

at The Suburban, Oak Park


Armory Show 2013

at Armory Show, New York


Scope New York 2013

at SCOPE New York, New York


ADAA Art Show 2013

at ADAA Art Show, New York


Shooting Stars: Publicity Stills from Early Hollywood and Portraits by Andy Warhol

at Corcoran Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C.


February
Topsy Turvy in Madison Square Park


JoAnn Verburg: Present Tense

at G. Gibson Gallery, Seattle


Miles Barth Joins Artnet


The Unphotographable

at Fraenkel Gallery, San Francisco


Katrina del Mar: Girls Girls Girls

at Participant Inc, New York


Robin Rhode: Take Your Mind off the Street

at Lehmann Maupin (Chelsea), New York


Arne Svenson: The Neighbors

at Western Project, Culver City


January
Silvio Wolf: Us

at Bruce Silverstein Gallery, New York


Beat Memories: The Photographs of Allen Ginsberg

at Grey Art Gallery, New York


Katherine Bussard Named Curator at
Princeton Art Museum


Catherine Wagner: trans/literate.

at Stephen Wirtz Gallery, San Francisco


Karl Baden: Roadside Attractions

at Miller Yezerski Gallery, Boston


Viviane Sassen on View


January is for Hot Shots


Richard Pare: The Lost Vanguard: Soviet Modernist Architecture, 1922–32

at Graham Foundation, Chicago


2012
December
Faking it: Manipulated Photography Before Photoshop

at Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York


Idris Khan: New Photographs

at Fraenkel Gallery, San Francisco


Jessica Eaton: Polytopes

at M+B Gallery, Los Angeles


Nadav Kander: Yangtze: The Long River

at Flowers, New York


Ori Gersht: History Repeating

at Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, Boston


Attachments

at The Hole, New York


1979:1—2012:21: Jan Tichy Works with the MoCP Collection

at Museum of Contemporary Photography, Chicago


Bonni Benrubi, 1953-2012


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